Author Interview with Daniel Yetman

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Author Interview with Daniel Yetman

Daniel Yetman, the author of Since You Lost Your Brother has agreed to let me interview him regarding his writing. You can find out more about Daniel and his books here. I’m very excited to feature Daniel on my blog and I hope you enjoy the questions/answers!

What were some of your inspirations for writing? Or who?

I’ll try to be as honest as I can be while still trying to protect identities. Right after high-school, my best-friend lost her father and a few months later this girl I had a crush on also lost her father. I had never lost anybody of significance from my life so I felt pretty helpless watching them go through what they were going through. That was the main inspiration for the title of the novel. I have strong ties with South Korea as well which is why the book takes place there. After my undergrad degree, I moved to Seoul to teach English for a couple of years, and last summer I went back to write this story and revisit all the hidden corners I had discovered. I was also going through a break-up while writing which definitely helped fuel the passion I hope comes across in the story.

How do you cope with writer’s block?

I have been pretty lucky and haven’t had to face a lot of writer’s block. I usually have a few stories on the go at the same time so when I get stuck in one I switch to the other. My strategy for writing is to bang out a first draft as quick as I can and go through many revisions, each time revising a different part of the story. Usually the first edit is a deep edit of the plot, the second edit is for continuity, the third edit is for sensory detail and dialogue, the fourth edit is for language and small details, and the fifth edit is basically copyediting.

Your book, Since You Lost Your Brother was beautifully written and is raw with emotions. Did you write it all down and edit it later or was it spur of the moment writing?

I had the idea for a collection of micro stories last spring and spent a few months plotting it before starting it over the summer while I was in South Korea. I started the first story in July on the subway train heading to my hostel from the airport, and I finished the last story on the subway to the airport when I was leaving in September. I wrote the entire first draft on trains, usually while leaning against a railing near the doorway while receiving a few curious glances. The recurring premise throughout Since You Lost Your Brother of having to let go of somebody you’re in love with was still fresh at the time so the writing came quicker and easier than usual.

Do you have more plans to write any more books in the future?

I’m currently finishing up my thesis for my master’s degree in fine arts which is a novel about a sprinter who gets injured before the Olympics. I’m also working on another project similar to Since You Lost Your Brother which I’m hoping to release in the fall. I enjoy writing about relationships and unrequited love so these topics will likely be reoccurring themes.I also strive for authenticity, not censoring myself because it’s safer.

Do you have a favourite book or author?

It’s hard to pick one of either, but if I were to throw out a few authors I would say Junot Diaz, Yann Martel, Ernest Hemingway, Haruki Murakami, and Leo Tolstoy. As far as favourite books, I would list “The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao,” “Anna Karinina,” and “Life of Pi.” I am actually living in the same small city in Western Canada as Yann Martel, but I’ve yet to meet him yet.

If you could give one piece of advice to your readers, what would it be?

Never be afraid of dropping the L word to somebody you’re in love with. Best case scenario you’ll end up with the person of your dreams and worst case scenario you’ll get a novel out of it.

I hope you enjoyed this week’s blog. Until next time. Love, Vee x

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