Why is peace education a practical alternative

Handbook of Peace pp 149-159 | Cite as

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Summary

How people can be educated to be hostile and hateful, to use violence and to be ready for war is well known and well documented. But how do you educate for peace? Which attitudes and behaviors are conducive to peace processes, yes indispensable?

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literature

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further reading

  1. Calließ, Jörg / Lob, Reinhold E. (Ed.) (1988): Handbook Practice of Environmental and Peace Education. 3rd volume. Düsseldorf: Schwann Verlag.Google Scholar
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  3. Haussmann, Werner et al. (Ed.) (2006): Handbook Peace Education. Interreligious - intercultural - interdenominational. Gütersloh: Gütersloher Verlagshaus.Google Scholar
  4. Grasse, Renate / Gruber, Bettina / Gugel, Günther (2008): Peace Education. Basics, practical approaches, perspectives. Reinbek near Hamburg: Rowohlt.Google Scholar
  5. Gruber, Bettina / Wintersteiner, Werner / Duller, Gerlinde (eds.) (2008): Peace education as violence prevention: regional and international experiences. Klagenfurt contributions to peace research. Vol. 2. Klagenfurt: Drava Verlag.Google Scholar
  6. Gugel, Günther (2010): Handbook Violence Prevention II. For secondary levels and work with young people. Basics - fields of learning - options for action. Tübingen: Institute for Peace Education Tübingen e.V.Google Scholar
  7. Lipp, Karlheinz (2006): Peace Education in the Empire. A reading book. Baltmannsweiler: Schneider Verlag Hohengehren.Google Scholar
  8. Nipkow, Karl Ernst (2007): The difficult road to peace. History and theory of peace education from Erasmus to the present. Gütersloh: Gütersloher Verlagshaus.Google Scholar
  9. Senghaas, Dieter (2008): About peace and the culture of peace. In: Grasse, Renate / Gruber, Bettina / Gugel, Günther (eds.) (2008): Peace Education. Reinbek near Hamburg: Rowohlt, pp. 21–34.Google Scholar
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  11. Wintersteiner, Werner (2008): Holistic, global, society-changing. Twelve theses on peace education. In: Gruber, Bettina / Wintersteiner Werner / Duller, Gerlinde (eds.) (2008): Peace education as violence prevention: regional and international experiences. Klagenfurt contributions to peace research. Vol. 2. Klagenfurt: Drava Verlag, pp. 14–31.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften | Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden GmbH 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1. Institute for Peace Education, Tuebingen