Under what circumstances are Hyundai warranties transferable?

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    Exactly not, but my dealer explained it to me in such a way that Hyundai will only offer a two-year guarantee for EU vehicles from spring 2017 and they cannot know how long the respective vehicle has been on the dump after production. There are also vehicles that have been ordered by dealers but have not been sold.

    This is why the date of the warranty registration is so important.

    I have to say that I bought my ix20 from a Ford dealer for a really acceptable price who also sells EU vehicles (including those from Ford).

    Therefore, he had to ask at a friendly Hyundai dealership around the corner first about the guarantee and the formalities and of course also about the first inspection (which the dealership even paid for me).

    There you get a questionnaire that you have to fill out and send it to HMD. I had all the data within 5 minutes and the service booklet was then sent to me.

    These are questions like:

    Were you informed that HMD no longer offers a 5 year guarantee for EU vehicles and did you know in advance that it is an EU vehicle etc.

    Never try to pee in the shotgun of an old trapper!

  • Guarantee is a voluntary service of the manufacturer and cannot be sued in court

    Nonsense. Of course, a guarantee can be sued. It is part of the contract when purchasing. And it can also be transferred, just as ownership of the vehicle can be transferred.

    However, the guarantee does not change if the vehicle is sold in a different country than intended! Just because the Czech car is now registered in Germany, the warranty conditions of Hyundai Motor Deutschland GmbH do not apply, but those of Hyundai Motor Czech s. R. o .. If the conditions contain any clauses on the distribution channel, then these apply as they are in the guarantee conditions (*).

    However, the anti-internal market clause does not apply due to the authorization to the dealer before the sale, which means that the car should have the normal 5-year guarantee from the first registration in April. Should, because other details could invalidate the guarantee. But all of this falls under the terms of the guarantee! This is exactly the same as if the intended inspections are not made. The guarantee also applies there, but it does not apply. Is it just like this in the guarantee conditions: Nothing inspection => nothing free repair when putt!

    Greetings Michael

    (*) They apply like any other contractual agreement. However, according to some experts, the clauses should violate current EU consumer protection law. For the normal consumer, however, this is a pigeon on the roof that should stay there for a long time ... So nothing with roast pigeons ...

  • Hopefully you are correct with your statements and promises that you give to others here! You wrote here several times before that there will never be a diesel driving ban in Germany ...... errare humanum est.

    Every thing has three sides: one that I see, one that you see, and one that we both don't see .....

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    Guarantee is and remains voluntary and certainly cannot be sued! Guarantee and warranty should not be lumped together!

  • Is it then only voluntary that your car has aluminum rims instead of steel rims if you have signed a sales contract for a car with aluminum rims? Guys, what are your ideas?

    You buy a car with certain guaranteed properties. So with a guarantee and with aluminum rims. That makes no legal difference. Just as you can sue for the missing aluminum wheels, you can also sue for the guarantee if it is denied contrary to the guarantee conditions.

    It is something completely different from what is in the guarantee. A manufacturer or importer can think up and define everything possible. No guarantee? 3 year guarantee but only on the engine? 10 years full guarantee? It doesn't matter. But this guarantee is bought as a virtual feature of the car, so to speak. Like the aluminum wheels. And of course it is also actionable if it is not met.

    The problem is that Hyundai came up with the idea to include in the warranty conditions that the warranty only applies if the car was not first sold by the authorized dealer somewhere in Europe to another dealer who purchased the vehicle for resale without registration before it was sold to the end customer Has.

    Our i20 is an EU import, but does not yet have this clause in the warranty conditions. If Hyundai were to refuse a warranty repair, then we could complain about it as normal. Because our guarantee says: "Broken car in Europe? Every authorized dealer in Europe has to help. For free."

    For the current EU vehicles, however, something else is stated in the warranty conditions. Basically: "You bought nothing from an authorized dealer? You nothing repair for free!". If you have this clause in the warranty conditions, then that's the way it is. No repairs for free. After all, Hyundai didn't promise either.

    So: You can sue for anything that has been guaranteed to make a purchase. Regardless of whether it is a guarantee or aluminum rims.

    Greetings Michael

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    Isn't there a EU minimum guarantee clause of 24 months on new goods?

    Never try to pee in the shotgun of an old trapper!

  • You mean the liability for material defects, which is 24 months for new goods and at least 12 months for used goods. The commercial seller must grant this to the end customer.

    Greetings Michael

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    ..... so in this case I have to agree with the fool.

  • Nanu? There is a post from me missing. So again: What J-2 Coupé writes in Post # 23 is bold, cheeky and, above all, wrong, because I never said there would never be diesel driving bans in Germany. As has often been written, I am against these driving bans, which are neither justified nor have the benefit that allegedly makes them necessary - but that's something completely different. We can be sure that these driving bans will still come in many cities.

    Greetings Michael

    P.S .: Of course that's OT in this thread, but J-2 Coupé's fairy tale in Post # 23 is it too. Also, his posting is offensive, so I need to be able to correct that too.

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    A guarantee is and still remains a voluntary matter of the manufacturer and has nothing to do with whether my vehicle bought with aluminum rims is actually delivered with aluminum rims or steel rims. I've rarely read such nonsense ...
    Whether the vehicle is designed as guaranteed in the sales contract has absolutely nothing to do with the guarantee. This is a sales contract that both sides have to fulfill.
    If the vehicle is delivered with steel rims instead of aluminum rims, the manufacturer must make improvements. However, this is not a guarantee, but rather the fulfillment of the contractually guaranteed service.

  • alsk1 - I fully agree with your statements!

    Every thing has three sides: one that I see, one that you see, and one that we both don't see .....

  • I will not evaluate or comment on your comments, but for everyone else I would like to describe what I have just done: I entered the words "guarantee" and "actionable" on Google. Even the first result is interesting: https: //www.deutsche-anwaltsho…vilrecht/garantieleistung Unlike here, experts are responsible for the content. And what are we reading there? "If a guarantee is promised, this must also be adhered to (regardless of the guarantee). The customer can also sue for the guarantee."

    Greetings Michael

  • Sounds absolutely logical to me.
    If a 5-year guarantee is listed in the sales contract, then this is part of the same as the aluminum rims ordered. That's exactly what Diesel Dussel wrote.
    I'm just not sure if the 5 year warranty is part of the sales contract

  • There are corresponding model judgments for such questions. Everything that is advertised by the manufacturer / importer does not need to be in the sales contract again, this is also considered a guaranteed property. This applies to the guarantee, consumption, equipment, etc.

    The story becomes difficult when an EU importer currently claims about a Hyundai that the 5-year guarantee would apply without restriction. In the event of an emergency, the contractual partner to be sued is the EU importer. The buyer then very quickly has the classic problem: If the guarantee is not in the sales contract and the dealer denies having promised, then that's the well-known story: In court and on the high seas ... There's a rat tail attached to anger and open questions to it.

    That's why I wouldn't and won't buy a Hyundai at the moment. However, none at all, not even one intended for the German market. Because no matter how big and powerful a global corporation like Hyundai may be, it cannot be that Hyundai just abolishes the European internal market for itself because Hyundai thinks it does not have to comply with laws or can deal with legal tricks.

    The exhaust gases are stirring - and rightly so! - all about the audacity of the corporations, with the guarantee, on the other hand, there is talk about gifts as if the guarantee were a free slice of sausage for the small child at the butcher's. No, a guarantee has a high economic value for the buyer and dealers and buyers know this and of course take this into account when negotiating prices.

    Greetings Michael

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    Regarding the EU vehicles, however, you have to say that Hyundai advertises with a guarantee, but only for the vehicles built for the respective countries that are also sold in this country!

    In short: if advertising is advertised in Germany with a 5-year guarantee, this only counts for vehicles that are built for Germany and sold here as new by a German dealer.

    If Hyundai Austria advertises with a 3 year guarantee and the vehicle is sold here in Germany, you only get the 3 years since the middle of last year.

    What I don't know for sure is whether a vehicle is also considered an EU vehicle if it was built for Poland, for example, but was registered for the guarantee by the importer for the first time.

    When we bought our i30 cw (built for Denmark) in August 2009 from an EU dealer in Brandenburg, HMD offered a 3 year guarantee and we even got a 4 year guarantee for ours !!

    It was explicitly stated in the sales contract. Now, however, I do not know whether this was a voluntary service by the dealer (in the service book, however, there was a handwritten guarantee for the acceptance inspection until August 2013 - and that actually fills the factory)

    Never try to pee in the shotgun of an old trapper!

  • Yes exactly. Basically, the guarantee that is available in the country for whose market the car was intended always applies. If the manufacturer / importer has other guarantees there than here, this other one applies. The conditions can also be better than here: According to the service booklet, our i20 only needs to be inspected every two years and not annually as is the case with the German model in order to receive the guarantee.

    The guarantee that exists in the respective country cannot be refused by Hyundai within Europe, that would be a clear breach of the law. That is why the clever minds at Hyundai have come up with a clause to withdraw the guarantee from EU vehicles, virtually bypassing the applicable law: The guarantee only applies if the customer on whom the vehicle is first registered has bought the car from an authorized dealer . If there was an intermediary before the first approval, the guarantee does not apply. The deal with the middleman is the typical case when buying a car from an EU dealer.

    The EU dealers also have a possibility to bypass the Hyundai clause: The cars are registered before they are sold. The guarantee then applies because the first registered owner bought the car from the authorized dealer (if registered to the intermediate / EU dealer) or is even the authorized dealer himself (if registered to the Hyundai dealer in country XY).

    Hyundais will probably hardly be available as "normal" EU vehicles in the next few years, but only as foreign day or short registrations. If the car is e.g. For example, half a year at the dealer's yard has already expired a half year guarantee, but the guarantee is otherwise normal. Exactly as you know it from domestic day or short registrations.

    To finally get back to the topic: The car that TE bought was, as he writes, registered for a German company for 18 days in April. If - which is likely - this company bought the car from a Czech authorized dealer, the car has been covered by the standard warranty in the Czech Republic since April. And that means a 5 year guarantee.

    Greetings Michael