What is the first step towards GSoC

German Space Control Center

View of the German Space Control Center in Oberpfaffenhofen near Munich
Mission control rooms of the Columbus Control Center, Oberpfaffenhofen

The German space control center (German Space Operations Center, GSOC) is the Mission Control Center of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Oberpfaffenhofen near Munich.

tasks

The GSOC performs the following tasks in national and international space travel:

  • Operation of scientific satellites
  • Operation of commercial satellites
  • Manned space travel
  • Expansion and operation of the communication infrastructure
  • Research and development of new technologies in the field of space flight operations

The work of the GSOC is divided into two phases in which different tasks are mastered:

Preparatory phase

  • Mission analysis
  • Tests (software and hardware together with satellites and simulator)
  • Development of the ground station concept

Mission operation (LEOP, commissioning phase, routine operation phase, decommissioning)

  • Mission planning (creation of schedules at regular intervals, depending on the mission)
  • Flight operations (commanding the satellite, monitoring the state of the satellite)
  • Receipt of data and provision for the user community

Furnishing

Control rooms

There are currently ten control rooms in operation:

  • K1: Largest control room in the satellite control center; is mainly used for LEOP operation (Launch and Early Orbit Phase). Since the beginning of 2009 the K1 was configured for the LEOP of the SATCOMBw mission. In December 2009 the room was completely refurbished. This completes the modernization of the control rooms for the four large control rooms. In 2012 the LEOP was carried out by TET-1. It is currently being equipped with new computer hardware. The next mission is expected to be PAZ in autumn 2014.
  • K2 / K2a: The LEOP of the TanDEM-X mission is currently being prepared here. From 1st half of 2010 the TanDEM-X satellite is to be brought into orbit and operated for at least 5 years after completion of the LEOP operation. The room is then used as a multi-mission room.
  • K3 – K4: Columbus Mission Control Rooms of the Columbus Control Center
  • K5 – K6: Missions in multi-mission operations (BIRD, GRACE, TerraSAR-X) are mainly accompanied or directed, e.g. scientific missions that are controlled by the GSOC in continuous operation.
  • K7-K8: Are the control rooms for the commercial mission SATCOMBw, which operates two geostationary communication satellites in regular flight operations
  • K10: Control room for the European Proximity Operations Simulator (EPOS)
  • K11: Columbus Backup Mission Control Room

Ground station

  • Weilheim ground station in Weilheim in Upper Bavaria;

history

Beginnings

After the Federal Republic of Germany decided in the 1960s to set up a national space program and to get involved in international space projects, the idea of ​​its own space control center became concrete. In 1967 the then Federal Finance Minister Franz Josef Strauss laid the foundation stone for the first building complex, which was opened a little later.

Focus on manned space travel (1985–1995)

Until 1985, the Oberpfaffenhofen location concentrated on the former German research and testing institute for aerospace (DFVLR) more and more on space travel. The manned spaceflight received special attention. In fact, the GSOC then accompanied two manned missions: During the D-1 / STS-61-A mission in 1985, the GSOC took over (payload) control of Spacelab, while flight control continued from NASA's Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center was acquired. For the first time, the Payload Operation Control Center (POCC) of a US space mission was directed outside of NASA centers. During this mission, the then Bavarian Prime Minister Franz Josef Strauss announced on November 5, 1985 an extensive investment program aimed at increasing Oberpfaffenhofen’s role in European space travel.

But the false start of an Ariane 3 in 1985 and the Challenger disaster in 1986 noticeably slowed down the development of the Oberpfaffenhofen site and thus that of the GSOC. Nevertheless, the GSOC also received a new building (today "Building 140") through the investment program, the foundation stone of which was laid on April 4, 1989.

With the D-2 / STS-55 mission in 1993, the GSOC accompanied the entire operation and had full payload control via the Spacelab. Thus, for the first time, there was unfiltered access to all data.

Reorientation (since 1995)

Not only the Challenger disaster slowed down the development of the GSOC. The permanently more difficult budget situation, which was made even worse by German reunification, caused national space travel ambitions to fade. The EUROMIR 95 (Soyuz TM-2) mission was the last national mission, with payload control already being carried out on behalf of the European Space Agency.

In 2003, DLR was awarded the contract by ESA to build and control the Columbus module as a European contribution to the International Space Station. A dedicated Columbus control center was set up for this purpose and has been operational since 2005.

One of the two Galileo control centers (Galileo Control Center, GCC) for the European Galileo satellite navigation system and is operated there by DLR Gesellschaft für Raumfahrtverarbeitung mbH - a commercial subsidiary of DLR e.V. Continuous operation is monitored together with the other Galileo control center, which is located in Fucino, Italy. The first step was the operation of the Galileo test satellite together with Italy GIOVE-A (Galileo In-Orbit Validation Element). The foundation stone for the new GCC building on the DLR site in Oberpfaffenhofen was laid on November 7, 2006 and the construction was handed over to DLR in September 2009 for the configuration of the operating facilities.

Missions accompanied or for which the GSOC is responsible

Manned missions

mission year Assignments / Notes
First Spacelab Payload (FSLP) 1983 Remote user center for the European material experimenters
D-1 (STS 61-A) 1985 Payload Operation Control Center (POCC)
ME 92 1992 supporting operational tasks; German cosmonaut Klaus-Dietrich Flade
D-2 (STS-55) 1993 Payload Operation Control Center (POCC)
X-SAR 1 1994 supporting operational tasks during two shuttle missions (STS-59, STS-68)
EUROMIR 95 (Soyuz TM-2) 1995 supporting operational tasks; German cosmonaut Thomas Reiter
MIR 97 1997 supporting operational tasks; German cosmonaut Reinhold Ewald
X-SAR / SRTM 2000 supporting operational tasks; German astronaut Gerhard Thiele
ISS-Eneide (Soyuz TMA-6, Soyuz TMA-5) 2005 supporting operational tasks; European astronaut Roberto Vittori; first operational use of the Columbus control center
Astrolabe (ISS) (STS-121 / STS-116) 2006 supporting operational tasks; European astronaut Thomas Reiter; first long-term mission in the Columbus control center
ISS-Columbus (STS-122) 2008 Mission control, operation of the European ISS communication network, support of the European astronauts and other ISS astronauts who work in the Columbus module

Scientific missions

mission year Assignments / Notes
AZUR 1969–1970 Mission operations, network operations
AEROS 1 1972–1973 Mission operations, control, monitoring
AEROS 2 1974–1975 Mission operations, control, monitoring
HELIOS 1 1974–1986 Mission operations, control, monitoring
HELIOS 2 1976–1981 Mission operations, control, monitoring
AMPTE 1984–1986 LEOP / Mission operations, reception, processing and archiving of the data received from GSOC
GALILEO 1989–2003 Mission support in preparation and operation for the "Attitude and trajectory correction" maneuvers; Analysis and performance monitoring of the Retro-Propulsion Module at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena.
ROSAT 1990–1999 LEOP / mission operations, reception, processing and archiving of the data received from the GSOC ground station in Weilheim
EQUATOR-S 1997–1998 Mission operation
MOMS-2P 1997–1998 Payload Operation Control Center (POCC)
CHAMP 2000–2010 LEOP / missionary operation
BIRD since 2001 LEOP / missionary operation
GRACE since 2002 LEOP / mission operation for both GRACE satellites
TerraSAR-X since 2007 LEOP / Mission Operation Note: 50% of TerraSAR-X is also a commercial mission in a public-private partnership (PPP) with the company Infoterra
TanDEM-X from 2010 LEOP / Mission Operations
TET-1 from 2012 LEOP / missionary operation
EnMAP from 2019 LEOP / Mission Operations

Commercial missions

mission year Assignments / Notes
SYMPHONY A 1974–1984 Mission operations (alternating with the French control center)
SYMPHONY B 1975–1984 Mission operations (alternating with the French control center)
TV-Sat 1 1987–1989 Positioning of the television satellite and troubleshooting of the non-deployable solar panel, as well as further tests to ensure the success of the TV-SAT 2 mission; Then the satellite is placed in cemetery orbit
TV-Sat 2 1989–1990 Positioning of the television satellite, handed over to the Deutsche Bundespost Telekom in 1990
DFS Copernicus 1 1989–1990 Positioning of the communications satellite, handed over to Deutsche Bundespost Telekom in 1990
DFS Copernicus 2 1990–1991 Positioning of the communications satellite, 1991 handover to the Deutsche Bundespost Telekom
DFS Copernicus 3 1992 Positioning of the communications satellite, handed over to the Deutsche Bundespost Telekom in 1992
Eutelsat II-F1 1990 Positioning of the communications satellite, 1990, 17 days after launch, handover to the EUTELSAT Satellite Control Center Paris
Eutelsat II-F2 1991 Positioning of the communications satellite, 1991, handover to the EUTELSAT Satellite Control Center Paris
Eutelsat II-F3 1991 Positioning of the communications satellite, 1991, two weeks after launch, handover to the EUTELSAT Satellite Control Center Paris
Eutelsat II-F4 1992 Positioning of the communications satellite, 1992, 11 days after launch, handover to the EUTELSAT Satellite Control Center Paris
Hot Bird 1 1995 Positioning of the communications satellite, 1995, 10 days after launch, handover to the EUTELSAT Satellite Control Center Paris
Eutelsat W2 1998 Positioning of the communications satellite, October 19, 1998, 14 days after launch, handover to the EUTELSAT Satellite Control Center Paris
Eutelsat W3 1999 Positioning of the communications satellite, April 27, 1999, 15 days after launch, handover to the EUTELSAT Satellite Control Center Paris; Hot Standby "phase until May 27, 1999
Eutelsat W4 2000 Positioning of the communications satellite, June 9, 2000, 15 days after launch, handover to the EUTELSAT Satellite Control Center Paris; Hot Standby "Phase A until July 9, 2000
Eutelsat W1R / EuroBird 1 2001 Positioning of the communications satellite, 2001, 10 days after launch, handover to the EUTELSAT Satellite Control Center Paris
Eutelsat Hot Bird 6 2002 Positioning of the communication satellite, 2002 handover to the EUTELSAT Satellite Control Center Paris
Eutelsat W5 2002 Positioning of the communication satellite, 2002 handover to the EUTELSAT Satellite Control Center Paris
SAR magnifying glass 1-5 2006–2008 LEOP of the 5 SAR-Lupe satellites, handover to the SAR-Lupe control center of the Bundeswehr a few weeks after launch
GIOVE-B 2008 Missionary operation together with the Italian Galileo Control Center in Fucino
SATCOMBw from 2009 on LEOP / Mission operation of two communication satellites of the Bundeswehr
EDRS-A from 2015 In-orbit test and routine operation of the EDRS-A payload on board the Eutelsat 9B
EDRS-C from 2016 LEOP and routine operation of the EDRS-C satellite

literature

  • Matthias founder: Lexicon of manned space travel. With the collaboration of Karl-Heinz Ingenhaag and Horst Hoffmann. Lexikon Imprint Verlag, Berlin 2001, ISBN 3-89602-287-3.

Web links

48.0873511.281388888889 Coordinates: 48 ° 5 ′ 14 ″ N, 11 ° 16 ′ 53 ″ E