What is the hardest part of CFOP

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Hello Sandra,

although I use F2L, 2LOOK-OLL and PLL, I haven't cracked the 2-minute limit either. To get under two minutes you have to train for several months.

I also think that not everyone is able to make 1 minute. Not even through years of training. A certain basic ability to recognize colors and to fade out other colors.

But to manage 120 seconds is also something great. Even if you don't win a speed cubing competition to impress family, friends or colleagues, it's always enough.
(02/21/2016, 14:50) MiniCube wrote: [->]Have a look at youtube, there are lots of tips for that cross.

Well, there are unfortunately not really any tips, as there are no tips for the cross. That's why it's the hardest part of the cube.
Quote:Well, there are unfortunately not really any tips, as there are no tips for the cross. That's why it's the hardest part of the cube.

So this is total nonsense, the cross is neither the hardest part, nor are there any videos for it on YouTube. And there are certainly tips on how to solve them for everything and everyone here, no matter how advanced! Here is one of the countless videos:

There have often been discussions about how fast you can get and what time you can definitely create.
How long you need for a certain time limit depends, of course, on how much and how intensively you train, also on how you train at all, there is quite useless training and there is just about effective training.
The time you can create at all depends on many factors:
on the one hand, of course, first of all by will, i.e. how much you want to achieve the whole thing at all and how much effort and commitment you put into it. This is the first problem that many people do not pay attention to or understand in a discussion about it, because they start from themselves: wanting something does not mean that the rest of my "mind" is able to implement it. A good example is, for example, to quit smoking, there are also many who definitely want to, but simply can't make it because ultimately it's more pleasant that way and there is usually no compelling reason to do so.
On the other hand, of course, to a certain extent, of talent, which in turn is made up of various factors and is largely related to cognition.
And then the physical condition.

Good but to cut a long story short, from my experience as a speedcuber so far, I can say that as a healthy person between the ages of 8 and 70 and with mediocre commitment and a system in which you need less than 100 puffs, you definitely get under 1 minute , even if it may take a long time.

Some claim that everyone can manage 10 seconds, but considering many facts (including my preface above), I consider that to be absurd. I know several Speedcubers my age and over (almost 40) that are around 20 seconds and under and for my part I can only say that I get lame after 50 solves, which is why I almost never do more than 30 solves on one Day made. In the last two years it was more like 30 a week and I'm still getting faster, with 10 algs. So I would say that if you are really interested / addicted, sub-40s should be feasible.
(02/21/2016, 9:01 pm) Sebastian76 wrote: [->]
(02/21/2016, 14:50) MiniCube wrote: [->]Have a look at youtube, there are lots of tips for that cross.

Well, there are unfortunately not really any tips, as there are no tips for the cross. That's why it's the hardest part of the cube.

I also find the beginning of the cube (white cross) that is the hardest part of the cube. By that I mean to create the cross in faster than 15 seconds by looking at the cube for a while and remembering the moves. After starting the timer, many can then release the cross in a few seconds. To this day it is still a mystery to me how they do it.
What I have partly done:
Look at the cube, plan across the board.
I then wrote down the moves on a piece of paper and tried to memorize them.
Then I closed my eyes and tried to do the cross with this "Algo".
Actually works very well. But it is a lot of work
Turning two colors is very simple. But to know where the other two colors should go AND at the same time consider where to turn them when turning the other stones. Awesome. So if you can do that, you can really be proud of yourself. I'm really impressed how you can do that.
Hello,

very coherent contribution AKOM, there is nothing to add.

At 36, I myself am anything but a youth in the scene, but seriously infected and fascinated by cubing ... which I came to like the proverbial virgin to a child.

In view of the fact that my mind corresponds to that of an average person my age, I work 9 hours a day where it is not possible for me to have a dice in my hand, and I do not set fixed "training times" but just everywhere I want and Mood just took a cube in my hand ... it took me about 6 months to reliably crack the minute mark (I have to say that I was almost stuck for almost 3 months at an average of 1:20).

I read a lot, watched videos and found out about advanced practice. So for a while I actually only practiced the cross. At first it was scary ... 100e cube rotations, senseless thoughts and even more senseless moves, and today I honestly wonder what was so difficult about it . I loose the cross without thinking. That brought considerable progress in time. It was confirmed that a lot of things just come "somehow" when you practice ... practice .... practice ... (even if it sounds trite).

Then came Part 2, that beloved and hated F2L. Great disillusionment when times immediately plummeted. Mn must say, with so much video material there is meaningful and helpful ... but also totally dull, differentiating and evaluating these requires in turn practicing ... practicing ... and practicing.

Often your own solution approaches stand in the way. I have often read that "holy" algorithms are being sought for the F2L, so that they can then be pounded into the head with an almost dull thud and thus solved case by case. That not only takes away the fun, but will sooner or later lead to resignation for many . I am unable to judge the general sense and nonsense of algo's in F2l, but intuitive solving should definitely be the basis. You can then quickly recognize the cases and solve them ... just like that without even a single algorithm.

As AKOM said so nicely, HOW to train is a crucial aspect. At first you shouldn't be fixated on sub 20 .... 10 ...., these are enormous results that you have to work hard for. Examples can be found in all of our lives every day ... who, although he can drive a car, would ever drive even rudimentary times on a race track like a racing driver ??? If I jump the 1.20m at school after the theoretical basics of the high jump .... then after 6 months I am disappointed if I still can't make the 2.00m (although the relative "Sub10" is loose at 2.25 - 2.30m lying) ...... etc ... etc ....! Respect all those who create such times, I will NEVER reach them, I am just that realistic.

Oh, how did I get under the magic minute at 1:20 ?! With a lot of effort and almost in slow motion, I practiced F2l without cube rotations (that is, mirror-inverted and "from behind" ....... and that's it . Every day a little faster and at some point I turned fes, uiii, 52 seconds ... tataaaaaaa.

And finally a comparison: All those who gnaw at the 2 minute limit or are at the beginning of their speedcuber career will perhaps say to themselves ... orrr, I would like to be able to do that too ... what a great pike .......... our sub20s will yawn and fight against the microsleep and ask themselves what role the old cardboard snorkel with its 50sec plays in the scene. The fact is for me, I haven't forgotten this feeling to this day as it was when I solved the cube for the first time ....... and I am just as enthusiastic about the progress made when I just do the cube ... without a "training plan" "and other self-imposed constraints and that is the most important thing for me, the fun factor ... and success - MY success.

Best regards
(02/22/2016, 8:03 pm) Reppii wrote: [->]What I have partly done:
Look at the cube, plan across the board.
I then wrote down the moves on a piece of paper and tried to memorize them.
Then I closed my eyes and tried to do the cross with this "Algo".
Actually works very well. But it is a lot of work

Whatever works well, just use the 15 second inspection time and see how far you can plan ahead. No problem at all if it's only one or two edges. While you are solving this, you can already look out for the other crossedges. That saves an incredible amount of time, so a cross under ten seconds should be feasible.
There are really tips on YouTube that are worth gold.

- Detect PLL case. Unfortunately I don't have the video at hand, but there are some tips and hints on how to quickly identify which PLL case it is.

- SledgeHammer. When I saw the SledgeHammer algorithm, I found it to be quite slow. Now I use it more and more often.

Some really good videos are unfortunately explained a bit too quickly, I then download them and cut them to size and play them more slowly.

You can't force it to become a speedcuber. Just as little as one can become a composer, a language genius or a top athlete. You have to have a certain basic talent. For example, I could never learn all OLL cases. PLL was extremely difficult to keep and it is still difficult for me today not to confuse some PLL algorithms and parts of them because they are sometimes similar.

I've been cube for three months and my breaks to find time to find F2L stones are still far too long to be able to call myself a speedcuber.