People value education

How do young people assess their education and future?

study

With the “WISE Global Education Barometer”, Ipsos and WISE carried out a detailed study with almost 10,000 young people between the ages of 16 and 25 in 20 countries from different regions of the world. The aim was to understand how young people perceive their education and how they look to their future.

01/24/2020 Nationwide press release World Innovation Summit for Education (WISE)
  • © www.pixabay.com

Central theses

  1. Young people believe that their generation has a responsibility to make the world a better place. But only half feel prepared for it.
  2. Young people are happy with the education they receive. However, they expect more diversity in their learning experiences.
  3. Young people are optimistic about their future opportunities, but want a fairer education system.

1. Young people believe that their generation has a responsibility to make the world a better place. But only half feel ready for it.
87 percent of respondents believe that their generation has a responsibility to make the world a better place. At the same time, less than half feel able to understand major social problems (48 percent) or to be able to do something to solve them (43 percent). South Korea has the lowest value here with 29 percent and 23 percent, respectively, while Germany is roughly average with 53 percent and 42 percent.

Young people worry about the future of the planet
85 percent of those questioned are seriously concerned about the state of our world. They perceive poverty and social inequality as the biggest problem (84 percent), followed by climate change and the environment (82 percent). Young adults in Germany see climate change as the greatest threat.

What young people expect from their school
The most important reasons for going to school are above all, 89 percent each, to expand your own knowledge and be prepared for the future. In third place (87 percent) is the desire to find a job and be able to earn money.

2. Young people are happy with the education they receive. However, they expect more diversity in their learning experiences.
80 percent of those surveyed state that they are satisfied with the education in their own country. Yet only a little over a quarter are “completely satisfied” (27 percent), which leaves considerable room for improvement. Young people are most satisfied in Finland and Mexico (44 percent “completely satisfied”), while in South Korea they are least satisfied (only 6 percent “completely satisfied”). In Germany, 30 percent of respondents are “completely satisfied” and 58 percent are “mostly satisfied”.

Diversity of learning methods as potential for improvement
The respondents are most likely to see room for improvement in the variety of learning methods. In Morocco, 84 percent of respondents were of this opinion, while India had the lowest value of all countries at 43 percent. In Germany, 68 percent of those questioned wanted greater diversity.

Specifically, half of the respondents think that their educational institution does not offer enough space for new technologies (artificial intelligence, programming, etc.), in Germany even 60 percent criticize this. Furthermore, 44 percent of those questioned criticized a lack of scope for creativity and curiosity and 41 percent criticized insufficient attention to "soft skills" such as communication and organizational skills.

3. Young people are optimistic about their future opportunities, but want a fairer education system.
Overall, 82 percent of those surveyed are optimistic about their future, of which 54 percent are “rather optimistic” and 28 percent are “very optimistic”. Young people from low- and middle-income countries are generally more optimistic than young people in higher-income countries. The most optimistic are the youth in Nigeria, where 66 percent are very optimistic about the future. In contrast, the youth in South Korea are the least optimistic; only 7 percent responded with “very optimistic”.

Nevertheless, the socio-economic background within the respective countries clearly influences the future attitudes of young people: 68 percent of those who identify themselves as low-income are overall optimistic about their future opportunities, compared to 84 percent of those who are middle-income and 91 percent those who classify themselves with a high income.

Young people doubt the equality of opportunity in their education system
Half of the respondents do not believe that the education system in their respective country gives everyone the same opportunities. But here, too, there are strong regional differences: 78 percent of Finnish youth are convinced of the equality of opportunity in their education system, while in Turkey only 27 percent see it that way. In Germany, 60 percent are of the opinion that the German education system offers equal opportunities. But one in four thinks that boys and girls are treated differently in German schools.

methodology

The study was carried out by Ipsos for WISE in September and October 2019 with 9,509 young people in 20 countries: In the Middle East (Jordan, Qatar, Lebanon, Turkey), Africa (Morocco, Nigeria, South Africa), Asia (China, India, Malaysia , South Korea), North and South America (Brazil, Canada, Mexico, USA) and Europe (Germany, Finland, France, Russia, United Kingdom). In each country, a representative sample (quota method) of the population between the ages of 16 and 25 was interviewed online.


more on the subject


Catchwords