Was Mr. Rogers a good person

The humanistic image of man using the example of Carl Rogers

Table of Contents

1 Introduction
1.1 .. Definition of the image of man

2. Humanistic image of man
2.1 .. Carl Rogers
2.2 .. Main theses of the humanistic image of man
2.2.1. Man is inherently good and constructive
2.2.2. Man has the ability to develop, because every person has a growth potential.
2.2.3. Man strives for autonomy and self-realization
2.2.4. Development takes place on the basis of the self-concept and the experience made
2.2.5. Conflicts arise from an incongruence between self-concept and the experiences made
2.2.6. Acceptance, empathy and congruence support the self-actualization tendency

3. The humanistic image of man using an example
3.1 .. example
3.2 .. Evaluation
3.2.1. Man is inherently good and constructive
3.2.2. Humans have the ability to develop, because every person has a potential for growth
3.2.3. Man strives for autonomy and self-realization
3.2.4. Development takes place on the basis of the self-concept and the experience made
3.2.5. Conflicts arise from an incongruence between self-concept and the experiences made
3.2.6. Acceptance, empathy and congruence support the self-actualization tendency

4. Opinion

5. Bibliography

1 Introduction

The aim of this seminar paper is to present the human image of humanism using Rogers as a representative of humanism and to illustrate this with an example. In the first chapter, the definition of “human image” takes place. In the second chapter, the main theses of humanism are explained and substantiated with the theory of client-centered conversation psychotherapy by Carl Rogers. In the third chapter, the humanistic image of man and Roger's theory are applied to an example. Finally, a statement on humanistic theory follows.

1.1. Definition of the image of man

“The image of man is the conceptual framework on the basis of which human activity is described and the fundamental value is defined. In this way, the concept of man provides a basic explanatory model and a framework for the development of concrete action strategies. ”(König 2005, p. 34)

In concrete terms, this means that you can explain human behavior if you know what view of man a person is. That is, on the one hand, the image of man is an explanatory model for a person's behavior and, on the other hand, one can develop specific strategies for action based on this if one knows what image of man a person has. Problems or situations can be interpreted on the basis of an image of man. (see König 2005, p.34)

Every image of man is always tied to a conviction or a doctrine and every person has a very specific image of man or a mixture of different images of man, even if the person is not always aware of this fact. For example, I wouldn't say of myself that I always represent a humanistic view of man. There are many images of man in education, such as the rationalistic, behavioristic or humanistic conception of man. The latter will be discussed in more detail below.

2. Humanistic image of man

“Humanism is a philosophy and a worldview that is based on the interests, values ​​and dignity of the individual in particular. Tolerance, non-violence and freedom of conscience are important principles of human coexistence. "

(see http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humanistische,2005)

One of the most important and well-known representatives of humanistic theory is Carl Rogers.

2.1. Carl Rogers

Carl Ransom Rogers, born in 1902, was an American psychologist and adolescent psychotherapist. He is the founder of client-centered conversation psychotherapy. Rogers was of the opinion that the success of a therapy does not depend on the knowledge and skills of the therapist, but on their attitude. He viewed the psychotherapy process as a personal development. He therefore developed client-centered conversation psychotherapy.

(see Rogers 1991, p.18 f)

"The client-centered orientation is a constantly evolving form of interpersonal relationship that promotes growth and change."

(Rogers 1991, p. 17)

In the following, the main theses of humanistic theory will be discussed in more detail and illustrated using Rogers.

2.2. Main theses of the humanistic image of man

(1) Man is inherently good and constructive
(2) Man has the ability to develop, because every person has a potential for growth
(3) Man strives for autonomy and self-realization
(4) Development takes place on the basis of the self-concept and the experience made
(5) Conflicts arise from an incongruity between self-concept and the experiences made
(6) Acceptance, empathy and congruence support the self-actualization tendency

(cf. lecture “Images of People in Education 2005/2006, Chapter 5.2, p. 5)

2.2.1. Man is inherently good and constructive

Humanism sees people as good and constructive, as a being who always has a positive potential. When a person is born he is good and constructive, but it is possible that the person becomes asocial and destructive through the emergence or development of inner fears, although the person is and always remains good in himself. For example, if a child is angry and breaks their stuff, they are still good at their core. He may have developed anxiety or something made him angry (e.g. he is not allowed to watch his favorite series). These external circumstances lead him to behave in a destructive manner. This is a situation-dependent state and does not mean that the child was or will always be that way.

2.2.2. Man has the ability to develop, because every person has a growth potential.

Every person has a tendency to develop all the forces that serve to maintain his existence. If this tendency is not hindered, man can develop and grow freely. This implies that people strive for autonomy and self-realization. So it is human nature to keep developing. He does not stop in his development and is open to new experiences. (cf. Grunwald 1979, p. 255 f) For example a toddler who learns to walk through a lot of effort. It strives for self-actualization and autonomy because it has growth potential of its own. If, however, the tendency towards free development is blocked, then man is inhibited in his growth and maturity. Most of the time this blockage arises in childhood and there are often various environmental factors that cause this blockage. (cf. Rogers 1991, p. 40 f) E.g. parents who constantly patronize their child and thus do not allow it to develop into an autonomous person. A blockage arises which can affect the whole of life and in this case the child gets a self-image, such as "I can't get anything on my own".

2.2.3. Man strives for autonomy and self-realization

Man strives for autonomy, which means that man strives for independence and freedom. He wants to make his own decisions and live according to his ideas. It integrates into existing social forms, but has its own opinion and will. That is connected with the self-realization of every human being.

According to Rogers, "every organism has a fundamental tendency to update, maintain, and enhance the experiencing organism."

(Rogers 1951, p.487) Let's take the example with the toddler who has just learned to walk. It has been given a little bit of autonomy and strives to maintain what it has learned and, above all, to increase it.

When the aspects of experiences and experiences come into consciousness, a process of reorganization of the self arises. (see Bommert 1977, p. 24 f)

Rogers calls this process the self-updating tendency.

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