Where can I buy inexpensive radiology books


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Ok, so next is the radio ...

Should you get yourself a book at all (I have to say that I don't necessarily want to become a radiologist ...) ?! And if so, which one? Are there any insider tips?

The suggestions of our Profs are the following:
- Kauffmann / Moser / Sauer: Radiology (http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/redirect?link_code=ur2&camp=1638&tag=mediforenbuch-21&creative=6742&path=ASIN%2F3437419900%2Fqid%3D1128343539%2Fsr%3D1-1 % 2Fref% 3Dsr_1_10_1)
- Kauffmann / Rau / Roeren / Sartor: X-ray primer
- Thurn / Bücheler: Introduction to radiological diagnostics
- Richter / Feyerabend: Basics of radiation therapy

Who can say something to them?

Rugger

Hi everyone,

I don't think radio should be stressful. My wife took the first one and read some learning texts in the GK - that was enough. I'll do it later (I'm still training to be a nurse).
It's more about the basics, radiation protection and co - that's well described in the "first"!

greetings
Red Bull

I have the short textbook "General and Special Radiology" by Lasserre / Anke / Blohm / Ludwig (Urban and Fischer), GK2 / GK3

The text is partly the same as in the "First", but a little more detailed and it also contains special radiology.

The book is well suited for the exams and is sufficient for anyone who does not necessarily want to become a radiologist.

Conclusion: recommendable

Originally written by Kiwi
Conclusion: recommended I just checked out the book on Amazon ... It wasn't rated as really great ... Are the pictures really that bad ?!

R.

I don't know what it is like at other universities, but for us, Radio IM GRUNDE was a big one. 3 lecture series (radio, radiation therapy, nuclear medicine) with respective internships and exams for ONE radio license. Some will say "great", but unfortunately little came across from the clinically really relevant, namely the diagnosis of imaging procedures. A book would probably not have made it easier for me either, which is why I still have no radio book apart from the corresponding chapter in "Das ERSTE". In my opinion, it makes more sense to voluntarily take part in radiological training courses or colloquia than to have a condition described using a picture as an example. There are, of course, very specific examples where it is enough to have seen once that way, because it ALWAYS looks the same, but on the whole, chest diagnosis, for example, is easier to learn if you just memorize the basic rules about the width of the heart and the various lines and then get many examples presented with explanation in an X-ray meeting or the like rather than making the whole "dry" out of a book.

MY conclusion: With or without a book - Rö-diagnosis is rather mediocre in our training.

I learned radio from the first, and that was enough for the exam and also for the Stex.
Otherwise I agree with Frog King's opinion as far as the X-ray diagnosis is concerned.

regards

Originally written by Frog King
... but unfortunately little came across from the clinically really relevant, namely the diagnosis of imaging procedures. A book would probably not have made it easier for me either ... Unfortunately, it was similar with us. The course was a sheer tough ride through radiology. OK, I solved the problem with the findings by spending a month in radiology and now at least halfway understanding the basics, and now and then even getting my suspicious findings right. But in the meantime I discovered a book that can really help you with your findings and that really impressed me in that regard: Jörg Oestmann: Radiologie (a case-oriented textbook) (http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/redirect? link_code = ur2 & camp = 1638 & tag = mediforenbuch-21 & creative = 6742 & path = ASIN% 2F3131267518% 2Fqid% 3D1128343883% 2Fsr% 3D1-3% 2Fref% 3Dsr_1_10_3). Well, for the theoretical basics (radiation physics and biology, device science, etc.) it is certainly not enough and the presentation of the material also takes getting used to (four fictitious students learn ...), but the book is really top in terms of content and didactic! I can only recommend it, even read it to the end (voluntarily!) After the end of my internship.

By the way: for all Heidelberg residents: you should take a closer look at the Kauffmann Radiology (everyone else too, in my opinion, the Kauffmann is the best standard textbook that encompasses the entire radiological area), the picture examples listed in it are precisely those which are then presented to the CIP pool in the course. But don't buy the current edition, because there will soon be a new (didactically improved?) Edition ... !!!

Rugger

Is there a book where the assessment of an X-ray image is explained step by step, so to speak X-rays for dummies?

Yes, the Oestmann (see above)! :-Top

R.

I already have it :-) but I'm looking for a book that explains EVEN easier :-))

Originally written by Zoidberg
but I'm looking for a book that explains EVEN easier :-)) I don't think so ... I took a closer look at all the radio books that were available at Lehmanns, and found nothing in that regard ... At most maybe what English ?!
And the Oestmann is not enough for you ?! Not even with special attention to the checklists before each chapter (I found them to be perfectly adequate and good ...) ?! Did you already have a radio?

Rugger

Yes, I already had radio, but it didn't help much ;-) How did you find Squire's Radiology from Schattauer Verlag, did you take a look?

Originally written by Zoidberg
How did you find Squire's Radiology from the Schattauer Verlag, did you take a look? I went to Lehmanns earlier and wanted to take a look at the Squire's (didn't know him before) - unfortunately they didn't have it there. What Schattauer writes on his website doesn't sound bad, but whether that's really better than the Oestmann (especially when you consider the hefty price - around 45 € vs. around 30 € for the Oestmann ) ?! Well, anyway: if I ever see the Squire's somewhere, I'll take a closer look at it and then leave my mustard here.

Rugger

Somehow, most of the books don't help me that much - in terms of the pictures - because the essential structures don't come across as well when printed.

The theory is helpful (e.g. I find "Introduction to Radiological Diagnostics" quite good ..... this case-oriented book ... the one with the gummy bear on the cover ... I find it a bit cheap). But I have to say that I'm interested in that.

Do an internship in radiology, because that's how I learn best: doing it myself, the pictures in hand, etc. -Learning by doing is usually best, unfortunately only the normal radio courses are usually not that productive. You should then do another non-compulsory course (provided you are interested - although I think that a little diagnostic knowledge in any later subject cannot hurt)

So: Radiology can be really exciting and fascinating: - Opinion

tried to learn radio from the first one (for stex, we didn't have an exam in the semester) and then failed because of reluctance and time pressure. actually it wasn't that badly written ...
Then I just crossed and lay very easily in the 2-way area, even though I still have little idea about radiology to this day. what i know i got when talking and in the radio courses. they were actually quite good with us every now and then ...

I saw a fantastic book lying around "with us" in the trauma surgery:

Radiological diagnosis of injuries to bones and joints (Thelen / Ritter / Bücheler)

Unfortunately this is apparently no longer available in stores ... (is from 1993 or so). I've browsed through a few times so far and think it's pretty good. A lot of pictures, also of normal findings, and quite short explanations of the findings. It only relates to trauma surgery / orthopedic matters, but if you are interested in this direction, I think this book is a real tip.

i recommend the squire again, it is a really nice book, very good pictures and well written.

The Dual Series Radiology has now been published (information here (http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/redirect?link_code=ur2&camp=1638&tag=mediforenbuch-21&creative=6742&path=ASIN%2F3131253215%2Fqid%253D1128343988)).
So far I haven't had time to study the book in detail, but I skipped it and I didn't particularly like it in the first picture. It seemed to me to be relatively poorly structured, I didn't particularly like the design (typeface, presentation, etc.) and the concept of the dual series (revision course on the edge) seems to me to be a disadvantage here, as it is partly. simply taking up space for the pictures.
However, I cannot allow myself to judge the content and didactics because, as mentioned, I have only scanned the book so far.
What do you think of the book ?!

Rugger

Speaking of which we are now with the books on imaging subjects: does anyone happen to know whether new editions of the course books CT, Sono and FKDS by Mathias Hofer are planned for the near future ?!
So far I only know the CT course book more precisely (information here (http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/redirect?link_code=ur2&camp=1638&tag=mediforenbuch-21&creative=6742&path=ASIN%2F3980558541%2Fqid%3D1128344106%2Fsr % 3D1-1% 2Fref% 3Dsr_1_0_1)), but that really got me excited!

Rugger

Originally written by Rugger


By the way: for all Heidelberg residents: you should take a closer look at the Kauffmann Radiology (everyone else too, in my opinion, the Kauffmann is the best standard textbook that encompasses the entire radiological area), the picture examples listed in it are precisely those which are then presented to the CIP pool in the course. But don't buy the current edition, because there will soon be a new (didactically improved?) Edition ... !!!

Rugger

Hello

Have now borrowed the Kauffmann and I like it very much so far. How do you know that a new edition is coming out soon and can you say when it should come?
:-read

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