Can recruit Delta Force DevGRU employees

United States Special Operation Task Force..or Why the Horror of the Legion Etrangere - 500 posts per page

simply means D-Boys or D-Ops ....




Delta operators

Deltas must remain fully operational for up to 72 hours without sleep.

The so-called "booming phase" begins after 24 hours.

The D-Boys don't like that, but they also know that it works.

There are only 2 ways to turn a D-Op off, either becoming dehydrated or having too many bullets in it. Otherwise there is no way to turn it off.

The Legion Etrangere once had the "pleasure" with the Delta Force.

It was a short one.

The Delta Force was born after the 1979 Theheran debacle.

When US gunships failed miserably to evacuate US embassy personnel.

D-boys don't exist, they officially don't exist. You are single, married, or alternatively, normal people. and are like you and me.

out of 200 who apply (mostly seals or rangers), an average of 4 to 5 are taken on.

they rightly complain that rangers or seals, optionally marine wimps, are.

d-ops are said to be on the way in iran to spy out the nuclear facilities.

Black Hawk Down



The war is back. And with it the war film. Not the politically correct anti-and-anyway-war film, but the full broadside: two hours of slaughter.

Based on a true story, of course. A routine operation that went terribly wrong in 1993 in Mogadishu, Somalia: Two American attack helicopters were shot down over enemy urban areas. Nineteen soldiers died. The deaths among the Somalis could only be estimated.

In this incident, producer Jerry Bruckheimer found the ideal material for a film that raises the glorification of violence to a new level. While the previous Bruckheimer films were bearable due to a basic attitude that seemed more related to the puppet theater than the illusion of reality, Black Hawk Down is uninhibitedly naturalistic, gets lost in an increasingly abstract permanent massacre and becomes obscene and unbearable at the latest through the moral hero-worshiping gesture . He celebrates the US elite soldiers, who with their iron principle never to leave a man, whether dead or alive, to the enemy, who first conjured up the catastrophe, completely unquestionably as moral victors, while the other side remains a black mob.



But Black Hawk Down especially doesn't work as a film. The tried and tested recipes by which Hollywood knits its successes are shot before the opening credits. There are innumerable protagonists whose uniforms and short haircuts make them look like eggs. Even with the voice, the viewer has no chance of differentiation, since everyone is constantly shouting. It doesn't matter if Josh Hartnett or Ewan McGregor or anyone else runs through the dust and shoots into a shapeless mass of black extras. No identification, no emotion, nothing that Hollywood is so fond of. The dramaturgical structure dissolves in confused fighting, you don't know who you're watching and you don't want to know.



Presumably this weakness is deliberate. Ridley Scott knows what he's doing, Black Hawk Down isn't a bad movie in the old sense of the word; it is staged with unsurpassable perfection. He consistently picks up where Spielberg left off after half an hour with Saving Private Ryan, and uses the same principle to make an entire film that throws the viewer into the middle of the battlefield with all the means of overwhelming cinema. Where, after the experimental start, Spielberg drew his moral heroism from a classically constructed story, Scott goes a step further and mixes hyperrealism with naive hero worship, which does not arise from a story, but from every moment, from every action, every word speaks too clearly to us. Everything aims at installing the protagonists as ideal models - so larger than life that they are denied any individual trait, any private moment. The mixture of naturalism and speech bubble rhetoric that emerges is unbearable, at least for us Europeans.



Black Hawk Down works at best as an involuntary lesson. He exposes any assertion that one can distinguish between the military and the civilian population in war, possibly sparing the latter, as a naked lie. If you want to learn something else from it for life, there are three possible greetings with which a soldier's life can end. In the film they are, depending on the age and marital status of the dying person:



Tell my parents that I fought valiantly. Tell my wife that I love her. Tell my children that I am fine.



After that, it is not that easy to find a suitable final word.



Dietrich Brüggemann







The action takes place on October 3, 1993. While trying to capture high-ranking supporters of the warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid in Mogadishu, two American helicopters of the type MH-60 Black Hawk are shot down. The dispatched rescue unit gets lost in the labyrinth of inner-city streets and comes under enemy fire. Surrounded, the rangers fight for their lives.

18 G.I.s (originally 19 is given, but one soldier died in an attack one day later) and allegedly more than 1,000 Somalis lost their lives at that time. The events caused a change in public opinion regarding US engagement in Somalia.
[To edit]


Criticism of the portrayal of the war

The film was supported by the US Army with material and extras, which is why there were certain 'considerations'. Some scenes were omitted, such as the desecration of two Delta Force soldiers (Gary Gordon and Randy Shughart, both posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for the rescue of the pilot Michael J. Durant).

The name of a soldier in the film was changed to "Grimes" because he was later convicted of a criminal offense in the USA.


"Black Hawk Down"

The true story

On October 3, 1993, television images from Mogadishu shocked the whole world. After a US "Black Hawk" helicopter was shot down, angry Somalis dragged the naked bodies of US soldiers through the streets. A little later, the Clinton administration broke off the humanitarian operation in Somalia. "Black Hawk Down" is the name of a feature film with which Hollywood staged the events - history reconstructs the true story.

"Black Hawk Down"

The true story

On October 3, 1993, television images from Mogadishu shocked the world. After a US "Black Hawk" helicopter was shot down, angry Somalis dragged the naked bodies of US soldiers through the streets. A little later, the Clinton administration broke off the humanitarian operation in Somalia. "Black Hawk Down" is the name of a feature film with which Hollywood staged the events - history reconstructs the true story.

23.05.2004


In December 1992, at the urging of the UN, the United States had sent 20,000 marines to Somalia to ensure that aid supplies to the civil war ravaged country reached those in need.




“At first we were happy when the UN and the Americans came. You helped the people. The problems only started when they started hunting Aidid. "

Ashad Dedine, Somali