Where do sperm go during gay sex

Safe sex and oral sex

Oral intercourse (also known as “French” or “blowing”) is the arousal of the genitals or the anus with the mouth.

The most important thing about oral sex and HIV

  • For the person who is being licked or blown there is no risk of HIV.
  • Only then is there one for the person licking or blowing - very low - riskif a large amount of HIV is ingested by mouth. The But the oral mucosa is very stable, and Saliva thins fluids containing viruses.
  • Therefore, only a few cases are known worldwidewho became infected with HIV during oral sex.

Nevertheless, the HIV risk associated with oral sex is usually completely overestimated. Since there are always questions about this, we have put together the most important answers here.

HIV risk and protection in different types of oral sex:

1. Stimulating the penis and testicles with the mouth, also known colloquially as "fellatio", "blowing", "sucking" or also called "blowjob" in English (when the penis is inserted into the throat, it is called "throat fuck" or "deep throat").

HIV risk: The person being licked or blown is not at risk of HIV. The person who licks or blows has a very low risk of HIV if they ingests semen in their mouth. The man's “pre-juice” or “pleasure drops” do not pose a risk of infection; the amount of HIV is not sufficient for infection.

Safe sex: "Get out before it comes" - this means, if possible, not to let sperm get into the mouth. If semen gets in the mouth or throat, there is very little risk of HIV transmission (there have been few cases worldwide). You can reduce this very low risk even further by spitting out the sperm and rinsing it with some liquid - so that the sperm only stays in the mouth for a short time. Even if sperm is swallowed, the risk of infection is very low. Drinking some fluids will then help flush the semen into the stomach. The robust esophagus and stomach acid protect against infection.

2. Stimulation of the female genitals (e.g. the vagina, the labia and the clitoris) with the mouth, also called "cunnilingus" or "licking"

HIV risk: The person being licked is not at risk of HIV. The person licking doesn't have to worry about HIV either. This also applies when menstrual blood is ingested: the oral mucosa is very robust. In addition, little blood gradually enters the mouth and is also thinned by saliva.

The vaginal fluid does not pose a risk of infection, the amount of HIV is not sufficient for infection.

3. Stimulating the anus with the mouth, also called "tongue-like" or "rimming" in English

HIV risk: None - To date, no HIV transmission by this route has been reported anywhere in the world. Even with easily bleeding injuries or diseases of the anus (for example hemorrhoids) you don't have to worry about HIV. Because the oral mucosa is very robust and little blood gradually gets into the mouth and is also thinned by saliva.