Which female CEOs have families

Top 500 family businesses - quota of women at the top is very low

A current evaluation of the top 500 family businesses in Germany by the auditing and consulting company PwC and the Intes Academy for family businesses has shown that the proportion of women in the top management of these companies is only 13.6 percent.

A current evaluation of the top 500 family businesses in Germany by the auditing and consulting company PwC and the Intes Academy for family businesses has shown that the proportion of women in the top management of these companies is only 13.6 percent. That means: almost 9 out of 10 of the top 500 family businesses have no women in this position. The rate is thus far below the result of the Allbright study, which found a rate of 29 among the top 100 family businesses. “This is not a beauty mark. Now the next generation is called upon to bring the companies into the modern age on this point too, ”demands Intes managing director Dr. Dominik von Au. Most family businesses, however, are not subject to the women's quota recently decided by the federal government, as only very few are listed and co-determined. “The quota sends the right signal, although it does not go to the heart of the problem, but only treats symptoms. With the low attractiveness of the MINT subjects, there remains a major structural problem, ”emphasizes von Au. In the case of many other causes, such as the insufficient individualization of working time models and the difficult work-life balance, family businesses in particular could lead the way and show on their own that there are better ways than the quota to meet the goal of increased diversity in management bodies .

Looking to the future, von Au is optimistic that this imbalance will change somewhat in the coming years and refers to the global NextGen study 2019 by PwC, in which almost 1,000 NextGens (including a third women) took part. “The female successors in family businesses are increasingly taking on responsibility,” says von Au. Whether women or men, around 81 percent of them basically strived for a leading role in the family business - however dressed. This applies to the global evaluation, but also to the survey among German NextGens. However, it is also noticeable that female NextGens in family businesses see themselves less often than their male colleagues in the CEO role. Looking ahead to the coming years, according to the PwC / Intes study, over 70 percent of male NextGens specifically want to be CEO, but only around 30 percent of women. Accordingly, women tend to see themselves more in the role of active shareholder with a position on the supervisory body. "The female NextGens who move up to such supervisory bodies should use their strong position in these bodies to work towards greater diversity in management," said the Intes managing director.