Why is the term oriental considered offensive?

You are not normal

Speaker:
Every family household has a kitchen cupboard with dishes to stack pots and pans, cups and plates in. Of course, one or the other breaks. This is part of everyday life, and such incomplete household items are normal. Still, it is annoying for some when it is not for others have all the cups in the cupboard.

Original sound:
"Someone, who doesn't have all the cups in the cupboard. Not everything is working correctly for him, I would say im Upper room. So the closet, for me that would be more like the brain, and it just has not all cups in his brain or in his closet'would then mean for me that he doesn't have all the things up there that he needs to recognize a thing. "

Speaker:
in the Upper room, so in the brain, not everything works quite right when someone doesn't have all the cups in the cupboard. This does not mean that someone is actually crazy, but above all that they behave in an unusual way.

Quotes:
"He amazes his fellow human beings with a reaction that is not expected at all. So that is, people believe him Hasnot all cups in the closetbecause he does something in a situation that you actually don't do, for example on the motorway at a construction site: You are only allowed to drive 50, and one of them thunders past you in the fast lane with 100; then I would say the doesn't have all the cups in the closet." / "Have a crack in the bowl or have a wheel, that's all on the same level. "/"You're not ticking quite rightSo you take things that are known from everyday life and assign some kind of error to these things, and then you project that onto the person. "

Speaker:
A cracked bowl is of course just as unusable as an incomplete bicycle or a clock that is not ticking properly. These images are often used in everyday language. However, it depends on where and how you use them.

Quotes:
"Well, I think, on the one hand, you might say it to friends and acquaintances, but rather jokingly and not meant to be angry. If you say that to someone stranger, then I think it's a small insult." / "Perhaps also as a statement when you've been annoyed with you, for example, sitting in the car and just yelling it out, knowing full well that the other person won't hear it at all."

Speaker:
Joking criticism or insult, that line is hard to draw. And what to do if a formulation is too rough? Well, most of them get angry, and the next day the matter is forgotten. If not, men like Walter Endlein will help. He works as a volunteer Arbitrator in Leverkusen.

Walter Endlein:
"In the majority of cases, these are cases that arise in neighborhood disputes, where fists don't fly or people are hit or thrown objects, but rather verbal insults that generally start small, start with little things, for example not And then one point where it comes down to the insult is the tone of voice, how you address someone. Whether I look at someone aggressively and address them aggressively, then the other person also aggressively accepts this thing and builds it too inwardly aggressive and blocks any further conversation and then feels offended. If I say now, for example, oh, you are antisocial, then that's a thing, well, people just talk about it, but when I say you are you antisocial"Then it's a personal matter, it's a very harsher tone."

Speaker:
The term antisocial encompasses a wide range of meanings. Pronounced as an insult in colloquial language, it means something like "socially weak", "simple" and "vulgar". Often one understands by antisocial People on the fringes of society. Antisocial as an abbreviation of "antisocial" actually means "non-community". When used in this way, the term is more of a criticism of people who only think of themselves and act completely selfishly.

Speaker:
The Arbitrator is an out-of-court arbitrator who tries to avoid litigation and unnecessary administrative burdens. In at least 50 percent of the cases, he also succeeds in reconciling the conflicting parties. Most of the swear words that Walter Endlein heard in his career as a mediator are of a coarse nature. But even terms that seem harmless can offend people.

Walter Endlein:
"I guess to say to someone you're crazy - is in Rhenish usage be crazy at the same time as 'crazy' - and if you describe someone as 'crazy', then in my opinion you are making a diagnosis, so the man is not very clear in the head, and that is how you evaluate him, and then that is already an insult . So I think if someone is sensitive, he could also understand it that way. "

Speaker:
On the be crazy, the processing of wool, flax and hemp, refer to several figurative expressions - and not only in the Rhineland. The term be crazy is very common as a term used to describe a person who is believed not to be thinking clearly. If someone spun something out one subordinates to him inventions. And with the derivation Web or Pipe dream is called a completely unrealistic idea. That too spun sailor's yarn, the fantastically decorated stories of seafarers, belong in this context.

Music:
"You are crazy my darling"

Speaker:
The number of colloquial terms is large for the small and large follies of fellow human beings. Explaining them is difficult for most, however. The faster the respondents come up with other terms that have a very similar meaning.

Quotes:
"A little bit stupid, stupid, stupid, a Knockkopp, a Santa Claus, a Candlestickswho has an inheritance on the wandering there a pea wanders through his brain, translated into German. "/" Or he has a screw loose, or he does not have all five together"It used to be said he had a tit under his pony."

Speaker:
Many terms allude to the fact that a person's behavior is impaired by an act or thing. The Stupid or also the Lunatics can no longer think clearly with one blow. It is exactly like that, when a pea wanders through someone's brainas a passer-by said earlier. If a human has a bang, then it was the volume that clouded his senses. However, many terms only thrive on the fact that they represent a paradox. Someone as Santa Claus or Candlesticks can be explained no further than with pleasure in linguistic play and a coincidental development of concepts. The inconspicuous word needs to be clearly clarified in terms of linguistic history stupid, one of the most widely used expressions for someone who is considered stupid or simply disliked. Stupid is the Low German word for "deaf", and especially in past centuries deaf people were often viewed as stupid or even mentally disturbed because of their lack of understanding.

Music:
"You are crazy my darling"

Speaker:
Many expressions that allude to a supposed mental weakness are interchangeable. In a very general way, they interpret behavior as abnormal in the sense of crazy. The colloquial language also has expressions ready for special characters.

Original sound:
"TheHunting license, that has to do with paragraph 51, and that is for those who are always repeat offenders and for whom no other normal measure can be considered. So hopeless cases like, for example, the driver's license, which repeatedly makes the same traffic violations. Who doesn't let himself be put off by the fact that they take his driver's license away, that he has to pay fines, maybe has to spend weekends in prison or something. Who keeps saying: Oh, what's the point, I'll do it with my left hand. "

Speaker:
A person who has a hunting license, is considered to be insane and has been confirmed by a court. Whether expressed as joking criticism or malicious insinuation, the phrase describes a person as a hopeless case, as someone whose behavior is not to be taken seriously. The term refers to the fact that the holder of an actual hunting license is allowed to hunt legally in his territory, i.e. to do things for which others are punished.

Speaker:
Who gets the reputation oneTo have a hunting license, seems to care little about what others think of him. He does not see or does not want to see that his behavior is disturbing others. Such an insensitive demeanor can of course also be found far from madness. Colloquially it is often said that someone has a board in front of their head.

Original sound:
"Board in front of the head, well, that is, if I am so narrow-minded and insist on my own opinion, I would say, and do not accept anyone else besides me, so that only what is mine will last, I would say now. Nothing and nobody comes after me. And nobody knows better and can do it better and will be able to do it better, so simply not to accept any other opinion. "

Speaker:
Such a Board in front of the head visually prevents seeing other people. Transferring it means not paying attention to their needs. Not only ignoramuses have a limited view. Losing sight of reality also happens to some scientists or poets. You will like the colloquial language in the Ivory tower plugged.

Original sound:
"Ivory tower is: Someone has built his castle, he has built his world, on which he is now sitting and enthroned and sitting there now simply on his convictions, on his ideas and hopes that no one will shake it, that the tower will collapse. "

Speaker:
Accept, someone is sitting in the ivory tower is a common phrase and comes as a loan translation from French literary criticism. The Ivory tower stands for the isolation of the artist who withdraws from world events and only dedicates himself to pure art. Likewise denotes the Ivory tower the scientist who pays no attention to the practical benefits or the consequences of his research.

Speaker:
The residents of the Ivory tower are therefore not crazy, but only removed from the world, are neither sick nor insane and yet do not conform to normality. In addition to the apparently crazy, the rapt and the ignorant, there are others who have a special place in everyday language.

Quotes:
"When you have, I think, made a picture, and suddenly someone no longer corresponds to that at all. Or someone is in the supermarket, for example, and you say, yes, you just act like this and like that, and all of a sudden There's someone sitting in a shopping cart and being pushed around fallen out of role. " / "So fall out of place is when, I think, someone has a very clear picture of a situation, how it should look, and someone does not correspond to it. Maybe if he is fluffy or a little irascible too. "/" So be uncontrolled. "

Speaker:
People who fall out of place, do not correspond to the image one would expect of them: a bank employee wearing an unwashed shirt, a supervisor yelling at his employees, a religion teacher coming to class on roller skates. Such people fall out of place or from the frame, the framework of the familiar and established, as well as those who step out of line.

Quotes:
"Sometimes they are rude too step out of line, I think, sometimes they are rude. "/" For example, when the sun is shining so beautifully, and someone is running around with an umbrella who just doesn't conform to normal behavior, but without being obnoxious and illegal and otherwise to be harassing in any way. "/" One of the stupid is, he doesn't really know what he's doing, he, he dances out of linewho knows what he's doing, but wants to stand out because of it. That's how I would define it - attract attention at all costs. "

Speaker:
We are certainly something linguistically today fallen out of the ordinary, but we definitely didn't want to step out of line and attract attention at all costs. True to our motto of staying on the trail of everyday German, we have not gone into the Ivory towerbut take to the streets. And one thing we assure you, it wasn't a bit spun sailor's yarn with it.


Questions about the text:

Colloquially, it is said about someone who is considered not normal that he has ...

1. a broken cup
2. a dip in the bowl
3. a wheel in the upper room

What is an arbitrator?
1. an out-of-court arbitrator
2. a husband about to divorce
3. the referee in football

Where does the expression come from sit in the ivory tower?
1. from a fairy tale by the Brothers Grimm
2. from French literary criticism
3. from Greek mythology


Work order:
Nowadays, telling someone that they are "crazy" is used and perceived less as an insult and more as a joke. With the term "anti-social", however, one should be more careful. Still others are hardly in use anymore, like the "hunting license". Try to find out which expressions are particularly popular at the moment and how they are interpreted.


Author: G√ľnther Birkenstock
Editor: Ingo Pickel