Why is the Mandela Effect a joke

The Mandela Effect

The Mandela Effect

May 23, 2018 at 00:00
@SawCleaver
One could also use the changing magnetic field, which is said to be able to affect memory.
All of these Mandela effects are a relatively new phenomenon, we did not have such false memories 15 years ago.
If our brain had memory disorders as a whole, then we would have noticed this for our entire life.
These changed pasts occur frequently in the artistically creative field.
Logically, anyone who, like you, is particularly interested / informed in this area will be hit harder and more often.
So, very simply, check the other areas, youth books, biographies, CDs, cooking recipes, if you don't have any false memories there, at least it's not your memory.


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The Mandela Effect

May 23, 2018 at 12:58 am
Well I can only say for myself - I never thought Nelson Mandela died in the 80s.

Perhaps this feeds on the fact that we haven't heard much about him here.
And with that out of sight and ears - out of mind - this felt dead for us. So according to the motto of hushing up someone.
That would also be something that the regime would have liked to have achieved.


But it's always very interesting who remembers which events and how. I'm sure you all know this when talking about old stories in the family. It would certainly be interesting to write down what you think and remember at the beginning and compare that with what you think maybe 3 years later.
For example, I have memories (from early childhood, around 3 - 5 years old), because I cannot say with certainty that they are my own or I remember them because they have been told so often. I think part of the Mandela Effect comes from situations like this.
But there are numerous "games" that show examples of how selectively our brain works.
There is a video where the right side of the room is told to watch the black-clad players on the left side only to watch the white-clad players - a black gorilla appears in the video. Almost none of the white fixated ones perceive. Almost all of them were fixed in black.


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The Mandela Effect

May 23, 2018 at 11:32 am
This is probably due to the fact that a meaning is more likely to be remembered than something literal.


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The Mandela Effect

May 23, 2018 at 2:09 pm
Hello, see for yourself, a logo like this could explain the spelling mistake with two -ee-:




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The Mandela Effect

May 23, 2018 at 3:04 pm
@suscat
@Yooo
That's right, when you concentrate on a specific task or purpose, you only perceive it very selectively.


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The Mandela Effect

May 23, 2018 at 7:41 pm
Fond wrote:One could also use the changing magnetic field, which is said to be able to affect memory.
All these Mandela effects are a relatively new phenomenon, 15 years ago we did not have such false memories.
If our brain had memory disorders as a whole, then we would have noticed this for our entire life.
These changed pasts occur frequently in the artistically creative field.
Logically, anyone who, like you, is particularly interested / informed in this area will be hit harder and more often.
So, very simply, check the other areas, youth books, biographies, CDs, cooking recipes, if you don't have any false memories there, at least it's not your memory.
That's right, because if the Mandela Effect were only based on normal memory gaps (such as the obligatory false testimony), no cock would crow today. The Mandela Effect as Mindfuck, however, is quite new. When did it start? 2012/13? I dont know.

I doubt the earth's magnetic field, although the animal world also behaves strangely at times. But this may indicate dehydration, and with the many dead fish from toxins in the water and the dead whales and dolphins, perhaps due to the sonar technology of submarines.

Regarding your last sentence and the list, I would assume that I know everything correctly. The only thing I cannot remember is the names of previous classmates. It would be a Mandela effect if a Klaus Pommel, whom I believe I can remember 100%, suddenly becomes a Klaas Pummel.
suscat wrote:But it's always very interesting who remembers which events and how. I'm sure you all know this when talking about old stories in the family. It would certainly be interesting to write down what you think and remember at the beginning and compare that with what you think maybe 3 years later.
The Mandela Effect, however, affects everyday things and not old stories. Something changes in real time, so to speak. For example, it was just now called Febreeze and suddenly it was always Febreze, and many are confused.
Yooo wrote:This is probably due to the fact that a meaning is more likely to be remembered than something literal.
I can only speak for myself and I think audiovisually. So when I remember something, it is plastic. Appearance, color, font ... all of this is saved. To stay with the Febreeze example, there is an additional reminder. My older sister and I always joked about Febreee ~ ze, making the "e" extra long. Maybe it was that too? But why should we have joked about it when the name is so unspectacular today Febreze?

Hm...


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The Mandela Effect

May 23, 2018 at 9:49 pm
@SawCleaver
Maybe it's like Dark City:
Something wants to find out what makes us human and therefore it changes memories. : D

In any case, I've never heard the "beam me up Scotty" and it doesn't work at all, because up until a few years ago I always watched it in German.
And yet, for years I had a picture with Kirk in my head saying, "beam me up Scotty" whenever I read that.
If I had not only seen it in German and had therefore been convinced that it was impossible, I would certainly be surprised that the sentence did not occur.
After all, Scotty beamed him up often enough.
It seems logical that he once said that when he was beamed up so often.
You just construct yourself a lot.

With your Febreze it would just be a wrong memory, precisely because you always dragged it out.


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The Mandela Effect

May 23, 2018 at 9:57 pm
Just like with Looney Tunes, Toon is of course a lot more intuitive.
But if Adolf Hitler soon no longer had anything to do with WWII or something similarly relevant, I also get suspicious. : D


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The Mandela Effect

May 23, 2018 at 11:36 pm
From the other thread, I think fits better here.
Yooo wrote:I think what we are observing here is the collective awareness when it is wrong.
That's the Mandela Effect.
If you briefly imagine that a single nerve cell is probably not a conscious person and so are the many others
Organisms in us do not perceive themselves as individual people:
Isn't that obvious, isn't it?
As individual critters in this organism, we have only a limited perception of the collective consciousness, yet it is there.
If it were a human one would just say something like:
The phenomenon arises from emergence, case closed.
Which basically means nothing else like: is too confused and complicated to understand.
Of course, we have the advantage there that it is of course quite logical for us that it be like this: "I think therefore I am".
But if we have wrong memories in the collective, we lack access to the collective consciousness to deal with emergence or "I just made a mistake".


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The Mandela Effect

05/24/2018 at 2:29 am
@Yooo
A good comparison that you bring shows that you have a very pronounced awareness.
Nevertheless, you mention it yourself, since it is about consciousness and above all about collective consciousness, i.e. collective perception, there are no mistakes, but at most a deception that one has fallen prey to.
I mean to say that so many people are not subject to exactly the same deception for no reason, after all it is a picture that many have seen personally, especially now with the Mona Lisa.
But the explanation may lie in social change, which is a smile, consider our biometric passports!


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The Mandela Effect

05/26/2018 at 10:59 am
Everyone has misplaced something before, but could swear to have put it exactly where it is not now. Thoughts can be just as deceptive as an optical illusion. The older or more insignificant a thought is, the easier it is to corrupt it. Even with very old thoughts / memories, those due to strongly linked emotionality work to an even greater extent than those without emotionality.

One can control in which direction the corruption of a memory goes. In oneself and in others.


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The Mandela Effect

May 27, 2018 at 3:45 am
Fond wrote on May 24, 2018:But the explanation may lie in social change, which is a smile, consider our biometric passports!
Hmm ... in the past women were sometimes shown in bold because fat women (well fed as they were) were considered sexy. There was also a social change, at the latest with the model Twiggy. But there was no Mandela Effect, and if you had heard of these global, collective false memories much earlier.
RitterCumallot wrote:Everyone has misplaced something before, but could swear they put it right where it is not now.
That is something completely different. (Sorry that I'm picking up your post now 😶)
RitterCumallot wrote:Thoughts can be just as deceptive as an optical illusion.
That's right, they play tricks on us often enough.
RitterCumallot wrote:The older or more insignificant a thought is, the easier it is to corrupt it.
Memories are fading, indeed. But the Mandela effect picks up on the everyday. What you just saw in advertising, for example, is suddenly different and has always been different. This is the crucial difference from legitimate false memories. Memories, if e.g. grandma and grandpa remember their trip from the old days wrongly or badly.
RitterCumallot wrote:Even with very old thoughts / memories, those due to strongly linked emotionality work to an even greater extent than those without emotionality.
When I think of James Bond's Moonraker now, I see Dolly with braces because the famous scene is a) funny and b) makes sense. I am not a James Bond fan, but I know almost all Bond films (because of my father, who is definitely a fan). Emotionally it leaves me cold. I still miss the braces.
RitterCumallot wrote:One can control in which direction the corruption of a memory goes. In oneself and in others.
To what extent, if I may ask?


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The Mandela Effect

May 27, 2018 at 4:00 am
SawCleaver wrote:That is something completely different.
What exactly is there now? Because one comes from the television and the other from the immediate environment? ^^
Don't see any real difference. Everything is more unimportant thoughts, little things that are corrupted. Ask Mandela's close relatives and friends. Wouldn't bet none of them had this corruption.
SawCleaver wrote:To what extent, if I may ask?
Memories that have a small, mostly unimportant contingent, are relatively easy to manipulate. The bigger and more present the memory, the more difficult it is.


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The Mandela Effect

May 27, 2018 at 4:21 am
RitterCumallot wrote:What exactly is there now? Because one comes from the television and the other from the immediate environment?
^^
Don't see any real difference. Everything is more unimportant thoughts, little things that are corrupted. Ask Mandela's close relatives and friends. Wouldn't bet none of them had this corruption.
This has little to do with the television set. If that were the case, there would have been many articles on this subject in esoteric or specialist magazines on the subject of false memories at the beginning of the TV age (still with the good old black and white boxes).

Personally, I only experienced the following (also something banal, I have to admit):

- My wife doesn't like it when you put sweet drops in the freshly poured tea. They go into the cup when the tea bag is out. But all of a sudden (that was at the beginning of the year), she scolded me why I didn't make the sweet drops straight away, as always ... In her opinion, it has always been like that, and she talked to me for so long, until I did even thought I remembered previous events.

- The other example refers to a phrase from the film "Unkussst", which we adopted into everyday life at some point. The typical "grabbing the bull by the balls" (our motivational phrase) suddenly means (when we saw the film again recently) "grabbing the bull by the cock". It's harder to say now, and my wife (who doesn't believe in it) replied annoyed: "Is that another Mandela thing?"

I would love to know what the close relatives think about Nelson Mandela. All I know is that the ME's Panic at the Disco singer is a bit confused about his own song. ^^

The effect occurs spontaneously and is not a long process of being forgotten, similar to the fading of one and the same copy. That's why it's different for me.
RitterCumallot wrote:Memories that have a small, mostly unimportant contingent, are relatively easy to manipulate. The bigger and more present the memory, the more difficult it is.
The biggest or biggest impact for me would be the Monopoly man, as I know the fun board game more than well.

I can only take it as my own for many, and then I am extremely confused that it is the same for many people around the world. I tend to automatically believe that something is wrong with the world (timeline, parallel universes ...).


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The Mandela Effect

May 27, 2018 at 4:49 am
SawCleaver wrote:until I even thought I remembered earlier events.
You already have the answer how it works. Your wife must have dug for it and found a part : D
SawCleaver wrote:The effect occurs spontaneously and is not a long process of being forgotten, similar to the fading of one and the same copy. That's why it's different for me.
As I said, it can happen immediately afterwards. But happens more often with older memories and almost always with "unimportant" memories. The brain is not a computer that keeps itself afloat with strict folders and absolute paths.
The brain works with associations. Every association, every connection, is as a whole similar to a spider's web. When you pull on a thread, several threads move. Sometimes two become one, or one becomes two, etc.
SawCleaver wrote:With many I can only assume myself, and then I am extremely confused that it is the same for many people around the world. I tend to automatically believe that something is wrong with the world (timeline, parallel universes ...).
I feel no different. I'm also amazed when I can expose false memories. But why come with a timeline or parallel universes? Don't you think that's a bit exaggerated? ^^
SawCleaver wrote:The biggest or biggest impact for me would be the Monopoly man, as I know the fun board game more than well.
Good example! Let's turn it into a thought experiment that you can test with friends. Have a chat with a friend about Monopoly. But casually mention the monocle (without actually referring to it) which the Monopoly male supposedly wears. Let a week go by and repeat the process. After another week, let him see the Monopoly male sign to see the result. You can do exactly the same with anything. You can even leave out the "waiting" between conversations if you are good at provoking a chain of associations in your counterpart.


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The Mandela Effect

May 27, 2018 at 4:00 p.m.
@RitterCumallot
I agree with you on almost everything, your arguments are quite convincing. ^^ Just briefly these aspects:
RitterCumallot wrote:You already have the answer how it works. Your wife must have dug for it and found a part : D
But can it also be possible that it is she who remembers wrongly in this case and tries to manipulate me with her incorrect memories? Consciously or unconsciously.
RitterCumallot wrote:But why come with a timeline or parallel universes? Don't you think that's a bit exaggerated? ^^
At the moment I only find my memories exaggerated, which constantly troll me. One tends to believe that nothing more can be done when it comes to remembering correctly.

Because I am very interested in quantum physics, the philosophical notions of a changed timeline, as well as the real (and not theoretical) existence of parallel worlds, are quite comforting in my eyes because they are logical. It forms a kind of lifeline, in contrast to the psyche of myself, which seems incredibly manipulative to me.

And even there one can now allow oneself to ask what is still real if one cannot even trust familiar and well-known memories.
RitterCumallot wrote:Good example! Let's turn it into a thought experiment that you can test with friends.
Unfortunately this is not possible because a) already tried and b) everyone remembers the monocle. Only hardly anyone (in contrast to me) assumes the Mandela Effect, but simply from wrong memories. I could try this experiment on my sisters with Tinker Bell and the Disney intro, however.


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The Mandela Effect

May 27, 2018 at 5:21 pm
SawCleaver wrote on May 24th, 2018:I don't even like to believe in an entity responsible for this.
That would be the next option for me, as absurd as that may be at first.
I just don't see any possibility, otherwise that is an inevitable result for me.
Febreeze can't become Febreze all at once without leaving an artifact and then the Titanic sinks, but leaves a dump.
Once that and ...

What bothers me about a "hard" explanation is:
There have to be two kinds of people with different timelines living in the here and now.
If the timeline has changed, then please change it consistently. : D
Every artifact that has survived the change has a story, it has a long causal sequence and dependencies behind it.
Just like everyone else.
It also created a great butterfly effect.
The person who has printed or read something has led a different life than the person who has not
has printed or read.
If now, quite real, two kinds of people exist, e.g. Those who have read an article about Mandela's death and who have not read any, although they always check the news, both of whom have learned something different in different realities, not only would these two causal consequences not only overlap, they would have to totally collide if the coincide in the here and now.
Even one or the other child will not exist or exist, just because of a small thing.
These two kinds of people with different realities cannot easily fall together without stepping on each other's feet.
Maybe someone bought a house in the other timeline, but someone else bought it in the other, and so on
Unless there is an intelligence behind it that can intelligently change reality or time, so that these two types of people can merge seamlessly (well, except for a little Mandela hiccups).
Or it is just the memory that has been changed, but then there shouldn't be any other artifacts.
In both cases, however, it would have to be an intelligence.
If you look at the ice cold as actual occurrences that were observed, in my opinion it would only work that way.


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The Mandela Effect

May 27, 2018 at 8:31 pm
SawCleaver wrote: in contrast to the psyche of myself, which seems incredibly manipulative to me
Man is inherently manipulative. At first there is nothing negative or positive about that. Sharing feelings with each other, bringing other people in a group to different thoughts, from humor to grief, is an integral part of people within a community.
SawCleaver wrote:I could try this experiment on my sisters with Tinker Bell and the Disney intro, however.
It is likely to be more difficult with children than with older people, or people who are no longer as flexible in their heads due to the use of drugs. It's best to try it with people you know very well, with whom you know which idiom goes down well with them. Just experiment with fun in a "reasonable" framework without wanting to force anything serious. You'll see it's easier than you think.
SawCleaver wrote:But can it also be possible that it is she who remembers wrongly in this case and tries to manipulate me with her incorrect memories? Consciously or unconsciously.
Can of course also be. This happens quite often unconsciously. Also in group dynamics. Many will also know that with several people one was certain about something, but in reality they were all wrong. ^^


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