Which constellation has the most stars

Storyteller of Heaven

Where do constellations come from

Many stars known to us have always been sorted into constellations by astronomers. Most of these celestial figures reveal themselves as a concrete structure when looking at the sky, others are so inconspicuous that their connection only becomes clear with the help of a star map or a drawing. The best known were already interpreted in ancient cultures, such as the Greeks, Egyptians or Sumerians, and baptized with a name. Many of them tell exciting stories.

Where are constellations located?

Just as the sun and the moon rise and set, the starry sky also rotates (or through the rotation of the earth, the starry sky appears rotating to us). Due to the northern and southern hemisphere, we cannot see all the constellations here, it is the same in the southern hemisphere. Some constellations occupy an intermediate position, because they are so low above the horizon that we can only see some of them. The visibility of most constellations also depends on the season and the time of the night. So if you want to know when as a star godfather you can observe your own star and the constellation surrounding it, you have to orientate yourself to the day and time. Some constellations are called circumpolar: These can be seen all year round in certain places on earth, as they circle around the celestial pole and therefore do not rise and set. Due to the so-called precession of the earth's axis (and also the proper movement of the stars), some constellations change their position over the millennia and thus also the time and place of their visibility.

How many constellations are there?

Some constellations lie on the so-called ecliptic: It is the apparent orbit of the sun, moon and fixed star sky around the earth (apparently, since the earth is moving). A 20 degree wide zone around the ecliptic is called a zodiac, and in ancient times the constellations known to us as the twelve signs of the zodiac were located in this area. The 88 constellations presented here are determined by the International Astronomical Union. This was necessary because there was a growing number of constellations, which also varied in their names and assignments. The current list is therefore binding. Immerse yourself in the exciting world of the characters in the sky: the constellations!

Discover all 88 constellations

Constellation

visibility

Max. Brightness

description

not visible

2.85 mag

The altar is an expansive constellation in the southern sky.

Winter to spring

0.77 mag

The eagle was already known in antiquity and with Altair it has a particularly bright main star.

spring

3.56 mag

Becher is a small neighbor of the water snake and is also linked to it in myths. Learn more!

All year round

2.06 mag

Andromeda is known for its Andromeda Nebula: it is the closest spiral galaxy to the Milky Way.

Autumn to winter

4.31 likes

The inconspicuous sculptor contains the galactic south pole through which the Milky Way rotates. Learn more!

all year round

-0.04 mag

The bright bear guard near the celestial equator contains many double stars.

not visible

4.05 mag

The inconspicuous sculptor contains the galactic south pole through which the Milky Way rotates. Learn more!

Autumn to winter

3.87 likes

Fornax is poor in light and is embraced by the larger constellation Eridanus. Learn more!

Spring to winter

3.63 likes

The small, striking summer constellation shines near the celestial equator. Learn more!

All year round

2.23 mag

Draco is a circumpolar (year-round visible) constellation in the northern sky. Learn more!

Summer to spring

3.00 mag

Triangulum stands south of Andromeda and its triangle nebula is a neighbor of the Andromeda nebula. Learn more!

autumn

3.77 likes

The distinctive ribbon of the Milky Way runs through the faint lizard. Learn more!

winter

3.76 likes

The unicorn south of the celestial equator is crossed by the Milky Way. Learn more!

winter

0.45 mag

Eridanus is one of the largest constellations in the night sky and contains a gigantic gap (so-called void). Learn more!

autumn

3.62 likes

The ecliptic crosses the celestial equator in the constellation of Pisces, this is called the vernal equinox. Learn more!

not visible

2.69 likes

The fly is a small prominent constellation in the southern sky and is visited by the Milky Way. Learn more!

not visible

3.77 likes

The constellation Pisces has been part of the Uranometria celestial atlas since 1603. Learn more!

summer

4.44 mag

The "little fox" in the northern sky contains some open star clusters because the Milky Way runs through Vulpecula. Learn more!

Autumn to spring

0.08 mag

Auriga's brightest star Capella belongs to the eye-catching winter hexagon. Learn more!

autumn

3.92 mag

Filling is the second smallest constellation in the night sky after the Southern Cross. Learn more!

All year round

4.03 mag

Like its namesake, the giraffe is large and can be seen in the northern sky all year round. Learn more!

December (partially)

4.45 likes

From Germany you can only see the northern part of the inconspicuous gravestones. Learn more!

spring

4.26 likes

Berenike's hair is a spring sky constellation between Leo and the bear guardian. Learn more!

All night all year round

1.76 likes

We also know the seven brightest stars of the she-bear as the Big Dipper. Learn more!

Spring, summer

2.78 likes

Hercules is the fifth largest of the constellations in our night sky. Learn more!

winter

-1.44 mag

The Greater Dog is a very ancient constellation south of the celestial equator. Learn more!

not visible

3.11 mag

The Indian cannot be observed from our position, he stands between the crane and the peacock. Learn more!

winter

2.58 mag

The hare near the celestial equator is home to the globular cluster M79. Learn more!

spring

2.90 likes

The bright star Cor Caroli in the otherwise rather subtle hunting dogs is easy to see. Learn more!

spring

0.98 mag

Virgo is the second largest constellation in the night sky and lies on the ecliptic. Learn more!

all year round

2.24 mag

The brightest stars in Cassiopeia form a conspicuous W that most have seen before. Learn more!

all year round

2.45 mag

The circumpolar cepheus will be home to the celestial north pole in around 3000 years. Learn more!

Not observable

-0.62 mag

The very bright star Canopus belongs to Carina. The constellation cannot be seen from Germany. Learn more!

Not visible

2.82 mag

The Southern Water Snake lies between the Magellanic Clouds, namely the large and the small. Learn more!

All night all year round

1.97 likes

The little bear bears its name due to its shape similar to the big bear and we also call it the little wagon. Learn more!

winter

0.40 mag

The little dog can be seen from all over the world, except for the inner Arctic. Learn more!

spring

3.83 likes

Leo Minor can be found north of the lion in the fixed star sky and is rather inconspicuous. Learn more!

autumn

1.74 likes

The crane used to belong to the southern fish and looks like an upside-down Ypsilon. Learn more!

not observable

0.77 mag

The small but easy to find Southern Cross is very well known and is located in the Milky Way. You can't see it from us. Learn more!

winter

3.52 mag

The faint Cancer has two open star clusters in its area. Learn more!

summer

0.03 mag

Lyra has my main star Vega, the second brightest star in the northern hemisphere, in its ranks. Learn more!

Winter / spring

1.36 mag

The prominent lion in the spring sky belongs to the ecliptic and contains many double stars. Learn more!

All year round

3.13 mag

The inconspicuous lynx in the northern sky stands in a star-poor area, its northern part can be seen all year round. Learn more!

spring

4.25 likes

Antila was only named in the 18th century and therefore has a technical name instead of a mythical one. Learn more!

not observable

3.27 mag

The painter in the southern sky was often illustrated as an easel on older star maps. Learn more!

summer

4.67 mag

The microscope in the southern sky is quite inconspicuous and was named by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille. Learn more!

not observable

3.33 mag

Reticulum is a diamond-shaped constellation north of the Large Magellanic Cloud in the southern sky. Learn more!

spring

2.22 mag

Corona Borealis stands in the north of the celestial equator and forms a semicircle. Learn more!

not visible

3.76 likes

The name of the constellation comes from the navigation device that was used by seafarers for orientation. Learn more!

winter

0.12 mag

The famous Orion with the prominent belt stars stands on the celestial equator. Learn more!

not observable

3.83 likes

The bird of paradise stands near the southern celestial pole and cannot be seen from Germany. Learn more!

autumn

2.39 likes

Pegasus is located near the northern celestial equator and contains a conspicuous square. Learn more!

not visible

3.85 likes

The pendulum clock is best seen in the sky of the southern hemisphere and was named by Lacaille. Learn more!

autumn

1.79 likes

Perseus stands in the middle of the Milky Way and takes his name from the Greek hero who killed Medusa. Learn more!

not observable

1.94 likes

The peacock stands near the southern triangle and is not very prominent. Learn more!

summer

3.51 mag

The peacock stands near the southern triangle and is not very prominent. Learn more!

not visible

2.39 likes

The inconspicuous Phoenix of the southern sky can only be seen from Germany on the edge in the very south. Learn more!

spring

2.59 mag

Corvus stands north of the giant water snake and also shares myths with it. Learn more!

winter

3.68 likes

Pyxis is in the southern sky and because it is crossed by the Milky Way, it contains two open star clusters. Learn more!

summer

3.85 likes

Scutum is an inconspicuous neighbor of the eagle and lies in the Milky Way. Learn more!

summer

2.63 likes

Serpens meanders near the celestial equator and is the only two-part constellation. Learn more!

summer

2.08 mag

The serpent bearer is a large ring-shaped constellation and lost the claws to the Scorpio after ancient times. Learn more!

summer

1.79 likes

Sagittarius is the southernmost of the zodiac signs and its shape is also called teapot in English-speaking countries. Learn more!

summer

1.25 likes

Cygnus brings a striking star cross and is therefore also known as the “Northern Cross”. Learn more!

Not visible

3.27 mag

In the south pole lies the south pole of the ecliptic as well as the well-known large Magellanic Cloud. Learn more!

Not visible

1.75 likes

The sail of the ship in the southern sky is very light and stands north of Carina (keel of the ship). Learn more!

spring

4.49 likes

Sextans shines near the celestial equator, but so discreetly that you can hardly see it. Learn more!

summer

1.06 mag

With the curved chain of stars, Scorpius is one of the most impressive constellations in the sky. Learn more!

Summer autumn

2.73 mag

The Capricorn stands between Aquarius and Sagittarius and is one of the 48 ancient constellations. Learn more!

winter

0.85 mag

Taurus stands in the winter sky and is the godfather of the zodiac sign of the same name. Learn more!

summer

4.1 mag

Corona Australis is an arc of stars and from Germany you can only see its northernmost stars. Learn more!

summer

1.16 mag

The southern fish stands very low on our horizon and is one of the 48 ancient constellations. Learn more!

not visible

1.91 likes

Triangulum Australe is crossed by the Milky Way and has a conspicuous star cluster in its ranks. Learn more!

not visible

5.09 likes

Mensa is the only one of the 88 described constellations that does not have a star brighter than the 5th magnitude. Learn more!

winter

2.65 likes

Columba stands below the hare and is zigzag-shaped, our sun moves away from the antapex in its vicinity. Learn more!

not visible

3.51 mag

The telescope is in the southern sky, it has nothing in common with "Herschel's telescope" in the constellation Fuhrmann. Learn more!

not visible

2.86 mag

In the southeast of Tucana is the Small Magellanic Cloud, the constellation itself is rather inconspicuous. Learn more!

spring

2.61 likes

The namesake of the zodiac sign belongs to the constellations of Eklitic. Learn more!

autumn

2.04 mag

Cetus is very large, but rather inconspicuous and, meaningfully, stands between the river Eridanus and the fish. Learn more!

autumn

2.90 likes

Probably the best-known zodiac sign is rather inconspicuous as a constellation, yet it covers space. Learn more!

spring

1.98 likes

The water snake meanders south of the celestial equator and is the longest constellation in the starry night sky. Learn more!

autumn

2.01 mag

The zodiac sign and constellation Aries on the ecliptic is small and concise. Learn more!

not visible

4.02 mag

The angle itself is inconspicuous, but contains many so-called foggy objects due to its visitor Milky Way. Learn more!

not visible

2.30 mag

The wolf hunts between the scorpion and the centaur, from us you can only see its northernmost part. Learn more!

spring

-0.01 mag

The Centaur in the southern sky is very large and brings with it the well-known triple system Alpha Centauri. Learn more!

not visible

3.19 likes

The circle shines in the southern sky and was named by the French Nicolas Louis de Lacaille. Learn more!

winter

1.16 mag

Gemini is a constellation in the ecliptic and includes the well-known stars Castor and Pollux. Learn more!