Blogger Resources and Content Creators to Follow

Blogger Resources and Content Creators to Follow

Being part of the blogger community is an honour. I’ve been lucky enough to make some amazing friends, have wonderful collaborations and make some long lasting business relationships. However, let me tell you it’s not easy. It takes time, patience, perseverance and a passion for what you do.

If you’re new to blogging, you will need to engage with other bloggers, learn SEO, study Pinterest, create content and more. This post is full of resources from myself and content creators I look up to! This post also contains affiliate links and links to my own products. 

SEO Resources

If you’re looking to understand SEO and make changes to your site, Nele is your girl. She knows her stuff and she is just a wonderful, genuine person. You can read more about Nele on her site.

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The Keyword Research course is perfect if you want to up your SEO game and find keyword search tools.

The SEO for Bloggers ebook is the perfect course to get started on optimizing your site.

This course includes: 

– SEO 101: how SEO works

– What is the perfect keyword & how to find it

– How to fully optimize your on-page SEO

and more!

Instagram Resources

As a social media manager and Instagram expert, I have created several guides for Instagram alone. I have helped travel bloggers, beauty and fashion enthusiasts, affiliate marketeers, authors and more with my consultations and guides.

My first ebook is Hashtags for Instagram: A Guide and I’ve had some great feedback from buyers saying that it’s helped them gain more followers and they have obtained more impressions on their posts.

My second ebook is a guide to Instagram strategies and how to grow organically. For only £6 we will dive into how to use hashtags correctly, how to engage effectively to bring you instant results and how to use Instagram stories to your advantage.

Pinterest Resources

If you’re part of the blogging community, you have likely heard of Ell. She’s a lovely person with a great personality who genuinely wants to help other bloggers make blogging their full time income.

If you’re struggling with Pinterest or want to make blogging your full time income, you can find Ell’s courses here.

Mariam is also a Pinterest expert and has created the Ultimate Pinterest Marketing Guide for Creators. In this 100 page ebook you’ll learn how to use Pinterest to skyrocket your views and sales. Invest in yourself and your blog today!

Kayleigh also has some great Pinterest blog posts on her site that I’ve found incredibly helpful!

Blogger Guides

Glen has a great guide full of resources, the basics and how to get started in the world of blogging. From beginner guides to tools and resources to use, Glen has you covered!

Nicola is also a blogger and has been blogging for 12 years! So she knows a thing or two! Her Bloggers Survival Guide is only £5 and it has amazing resources for newbies and full time bloggers.

Other Social Media Guides

My Social Media Handbook is perfect for beginners or anyone wanting to gain more knowledge on a particular platform or subject. This handbook will give you all the insights of using platforms as a business or blogger from the perspective of a social media manager and marketeer.

Learn new techniques, how to use hashtags, what content to be putting out there and how you can be connecting with people via social platforms. In this handy course I have set you tasks, given you website recommendations, offered advice and much more.

Blogger Resources and Content Creators to Follow

Affiliate Marketing

Are you new to the world of affiliate marketing? Do you want to make more sales? Are you struggling to understand what affiliate marketing involves and need a helping hand in how to promote products?

In this 18 page ebook we will be exploring the world of affiliate marketing and how it can change your life, make you money and shape your business.

Contents:

• What is affiliate marketing?

• Where do I begin?

• What products should I affiliate for?

• How to become an affiliate

• How to promote products on social media

• Using email marketing to sell

• Getting in the DMs

• Finding affiliates for your products

If you are struggling, you’re a beginner or you simply want to improve as an affiliate, this is the ebook for you.

Content Creators to Follow

Kayleigh is one of my amazing affiliates, friends and content creators I look up to. She’s amazing at Pinterest, blogging and offering advice. You can find her at Kayleighzaraa.com.

Mariam is a personal development and lifestyle blogger who has so much knowledge about blogging, career advice, finances and more! She’s the definition of a boss babe. You can find her at bossbabechroniclesblog.com.

Naomi is a wonderful lifestyle and beauty blogger, always looking to support others. You can find her over at Naomirowen.com.

Ashleigh is a lifestyle and family blogger who is always so supportive and posts some really motivational blogs. You can find her at ashleighsmoments.com.

Shea is a YouTuber, blogger and course creator. She’s a ray of sunshine on Twitter and her blog has some amazing growth strategies for YouTubers and content creators. You can follow her at adaywithshea.com.

I hope you enjoyed this post. If you haven’t already, make sure to follow all of the bloggers above for future tips and I hope you find a course/ebook that works for you!

Boycotting Black Friday

Boycotting Black Friday

If you’re anything like me you’ll love a bargain. Black Friday is the ideal time to get that new dress or make up palatte or console you’ve had your eye on. But when we take a look at the facts, will we really want to be spending our hard earned money on unsustainable items?

So, before we take a look at how unsustainable Black Friday actually is, let’s take a look at how it effects you as a customer and as an employee.

Over a 100 injuries occur on Black Friday and 12 people have actually died since 2006 while shopping. Can you imagine being so desperate for a sale that your life actually depends on it? Not only is this horrific for the customer but imagine what the staff have to go through; late nights, early mornings and dealing with bloody rude customers.

Now that we’ve had a look at the cons for customers and staff, let’s take a look at the unsustainable side. It’s averaged that the UK will spend around £5.6 billion on Black Friday and Cyber Monday this year. Think of the amount of Fast Fashion retailers taking part in this. The amount of clothes that will be bought and thrown to the back of the wardrobe without another thought; or tossed into landfill after one use. Think of how much time has gone into making these clothes from workers who aren’t even paid a minimum wage. As a country we have bought into this mindset of how we need the latest staple piece from Topshop or we need these amazing shoes from Missguided. The amount of clothes bought in the UK alone is astonishing.

However, there are some fashion retailers who are abandoning the tradition of Black Friday such as Monki. On their website they have written a statement about how they will not have any deals and they’ve called it “Black Fri-nay” which is kinda cliche but catchy if you ask me. To me, even though Monki is only rated as “It’s a start” on Good On You, I would much rather buy from a brand such as this than I would Pretty Little Thing, one of the worst fast fashion companies there is.

Did you know more than 83% of Black Friday shoppers say they would buy their items and gifts via mobile? It may be great for people who work or don’t want to be trampled by crowds, but in reality, it’s scary to think that a new pair of boots or a new tee is only a click away. Fast fashion retailers have so much power over their customers. There’s always a sale section, but Black Friday is their day to shine.

But why are we conditioned to want the latest item of clothing or the newest accessory? I read an interesting article recently about the Diderot Effect. “The Diderot Effect states that obtaining a new possession often creates a spiral of consumption which leads you to acquire more new things. As a result, we end up buying things that our previous selves never needed to feel happy or fulfilled.” It makes sense that we buy items we don’t need, we just think we need to have them. This, to me, is how fast fashion retailers get us.

So, what can we do to boycott Black Friday and Cyber Monday this year?

For a start, do not give in to the deals you see pop up on your Facebook feed or click on a link to Boohoo deals that your best friend sent you. As hard as it can be if you’re new to the sustainable approach, you have to have some willpower.

Unsubscribe to retailers emails that will undoubtedly be sent to you today and Monday.

I recently noticed I still follow some fast fashion retailers on Facebook and finally got around to unliking the pages so there’s no temptation to look or support them in any way.

You can also create your own blog posts or share your thoughts on your social media channels.

There’s even events going on you can take part in. My sustainable friend Becky is speaking at an event this weekend. You can find the events here.

You can also support small businesses hosting black Friday deals such as etsy businesses or buy on depop or ebay. There’s still ways to get the deals you want, you just have to be more eco conscious!

What are you doing to boycott Black Friday?

Sources:

https://www.finder.com/uk/black-friday-statistics

https://www.nbcnews.com/better/lifestyle/what-buy-what-skip-black-friday-ncna1091706

https://jamesclear.com/diderot-effect

Book Review: #Girlboss

Book Review: #Girlboss

I read #Girlboss earlier in the year because I’ve already watched the Netflix show twice and wanted to know more about Sophia Amoruso.

About #Girlboss

Girlboss was written by Sophia Amoruso after she created Nasty Gal and has turned her business into a multi million dollar company. She shares her top tips on everything from interviewing to talking with investors. There are Girlboss profiles interviewing amazing freelancers and Nasty Gal stylists.

She talks in detail about being different and how not having a business plan worked out. After all, she started on eBay and now look at her. She’s now the CEO and founder of Nasty Gal, and more recently, Girlboss.

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Review

I’ve wanted to read #Girlboss ever since I watched the TV series. The way Sophia rebelled against “working for the man” inspired me because I don’t want to be a cog in a machine for someone to get rich while I get naff all.

This book spoke to me, and not because I want to create my own eBay business or anything of the sort. I just want to kick ass and be a Girlboss in everything I do, from wearing clothes to working for myself.

Throughout the book, Sophia jumps around from her childhood to now, to the future. It would be confusing if I didn’t watch the show and if her points didn’t make sense in the chapters. But everything spoke to me and her words make me want to believe in myself. It’s so inspiring to think she made a business out of selling vintage clothes on eBay. Just think of what you could do!

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I love books like this because they motivate you to get out of bed in the morning and do something with your life instead of sitting around watching Jeremy Kyle all morning. After reading that I feel like I can do anything. Isn’t that the effect you want from books?

If you want to start you own business or just want to know how to be a Girlboss, then I urge you to read this!

Fast Fashion: The Facts

Fast Fashion: The Facts

Fast fashion is the reason why I shop secondhand. From being the queen of Depop and eBay to charity shop diving, I am starting to get the hang of it.

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I went to an event in London where they were offering tips on how to be more sustainable and one thing I took away with me is that I know I could easily shop secondhand. After all, I had been doing it for months already. So I started following sustainable and Eco friendly accounts on Twitter and Instagram to get some more tips and follow like minded people. But when it comes to the fast fashion industry, what are the facts? We are always hearing how bad fast fashion is, but how bad actually is it? Let’s find out, shall we?

  1. It takes 2,700 liters of water to make one t-shirt. That’s how much we usually drink over a 3 year period
  2. Americans buy twice as many items of clothing than they did 20 years ago
  3. Extending the life of clothing by a further 9 months would reduce carbon, waste and water footprints by around 20-30% each
  4. It takes polyester 100 years to degrade on landfill
  5. Australians are the world’s second largest consumers of fashion. On average they consume 27kgs of new clothing and textiles a year and the average woman only uses 33% of her wardrobe
  6. Greenpeace estimates that around 20% of clothing won’t be worn a single time
  7. Around 40% of apparel in the United States is imported from China.
  8. 80% of garment workers are women aged 18-35 who have no access to maternity leave
  9. In 2018 fashion shoppers spent £3.5 billion on Christmas party clothing
  10. Asos sources more than 59 million plastic mailing bags and five million cardboard mailing boxes every year to deliver to their customers
  11. The fashion industry contributes £28 billion to the UK economy
  12. Over 100 billion garments are made each year and 40% of the items will be discarded or unworn
  13. Only 10% of donated clothes in charity shops and thrift stores ever get bought
  14. In the USA 10.5 million tons of clothing is sent to landfill every year. That’s about 30 times as heavy as the empire state building
  15. 1 garbage truck of clothes is burned every second which is enough to fill Sydney harbor every year
  16. Total green house gas emissions from textiles production are more than all international flights and maritime shipping combined
  17. The global apparel and footwear industry accounts for 8% of the world’s greenhouse gases
  18. There are roughly 40 million garment workers worldwide, the majority of whom make less than $3 a day
  19. In Bangladesh, garment workers make £44 a month which is 1/4 of a living wage
  20. 60% of garment workers in India and Bangladesh have experienced harassment, verbal or physical abuse

Aren’t these facts insane? Do you feel any differently about how and where you buy your clothes from? For me, I can’t buy anything from a retailer unless it’s an absolute necessity such as knickers and socks (haven’t found anywhere sustainable to buy these so if you have recommendations please send them my way).

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Sources:

The Guardian

Huffpost

Greenpeace

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